Begun in 1982 by Armstrong State College’s Department of Languages, Literature and Dramatic Arts, the lecture series soon expanded to include faculty from other departments and continues to the present. Each spring a committee selects 8-10 lectures from proposals submitted by faculty across campus. Aimed at both the campus and wider community, many lecturers present a popular take on an academic specialty—such as a Criminal Justice professor on “Use of Deadly Force” (1987) or a lecture on Irish literature for St. Patrick ’s Day or a mathematician’s answer to “Does it pay to play the lottery?” Others are more personal such as when Dr. Evelyn Dandy answered the question, “What is it like to be the only one?” (1989.) And some draw on faculty members’ outside interests, such as historian Robert Patterson’s “Baseball as Metaphor.” In 1996 the series was named after Robert Ingram Strozier, alum and long serving member of Armstrong’s English faculty who spearheaded the creation of the series and was a lively contributor.

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Submissions from 2006

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Are we Prepared for Pandemic Bird Flu?, AASU Interdisciplinary Bird Flu Group

Submissions from 2002

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The Impact of John Cage on Art and Music, Kevin Hampton and Jill Miller

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Will This be the Chinese Century?, George B. Pruden

Submissions from 2000

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Not My Child! Study of health behaviors of 9th grade students in Chatham County, Marilyn M. Buck and Sandy Streater

Submissions from 1993

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6th Annual Sebastian Dangerfield Lecture, Frank Clancy

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Medieval Books & Libraries, Bernard Comaskey

Submissions from 1982

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The Nature of Comedy in Modern Fiction, Brad Crain

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The Great Gatsby: A Reading, James Land Jones

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Noel Coward: the Talent to Amuse, John Suchower