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Abstract

Excerpt: When I first became involved formally in scholarship of teaching and learning, it was the result of frustration and surprise tempered by high expectations and hope. I was teaching in a school of liberal studies that used program portfolios as an intellectual organizing feature and culminating assessment (self and otherwise). Students were to use this portfolio (physical, not online) to collect and reflect on work they accomplished during their time in the program. But in teaching the senior synthesis course, wherein students were to “go meta” with the portfolio and reflect on their entire undergraduate experience, I learned that virtually all of them treated the portfolio not as...

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Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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