Proposal Title

High Resolution Inorganic Carbon Measurements in Savannah Marshes

Primary Faculty Mentor’s Name

Sarah Gray

Proposal Track

Student

Session Format

Poster

Abstract

Mathew Holmes

High resolution inorganic carbon measurements in Savannah marshes

To develop a better understanding of the carbon Dioxide (CO2)cycling in coastal and estuary areas of the southeast in situ data has been collected but to establish a full picture more information must be collected. In this work, water samples from the Savannah area, mainly brackish estuary water from local marsh systems, were analyzed in situ for temperature in Celsius, salinity (which is the dissolved content of the water), dissolved oxygen (O2)concentration, and pH (which is the Hydrogen concentration) using sensors set at the surface and the bottom of the river. When any two of the four inorganic carbon variables have been measured the other two can be calculated using modeling. NDIR (Non-dispersive infrared) sensors that have been adapted from use in large scale factory settings to measure hazardous gases for use in the field now be used for in situ situations to measure CO2 fluctuations above the river’s surface. In addition to field measurements, grab samples were analyzed for pH in the laboratory using spectrophotometric techniques that rely on meta-cresol purple and a standard temperature of 25 degrees Celsius set by a water bath to determine pH. The in situ field test in marsh systems around the Armstrong area show strong correlations between water depth and the measurement parameters. At the river bottom, dissolved O2 concentrations were much lower than dissolved O2 at the river surface. These differences are only increased due to tidal influences which were observed to have a direct effect on all the variables by infusing marsh systems with sea water. During low tides it was found that the water systems would have high salinity values at the river bottom and low salinity at the surface highlighting the marsh systems ability to rapidly change.

Award Consideration

1

Location

Concourse/Atrium

Presentation Year

2014

Start Date

11-15-2014 2:55 PM

End Date

11-15-2014 4:10 PM

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Nov 15th, 2:55 PM Nov 15th, 4:10 PM

High Resolution Inorganic Carbon Measurements in Savannah Marshes

Concourse/Atrium

Mathew Holmes

High resolution inorganic carbon measurements in Savannah marshes

To develop a better understanding of the carbon Dioxide (CO2)cycling in coastal and estuary areas of the southeast in situ data has been collected but to establish a full picture more information must be collected. In this work, water samples from the Savannah area, mainly brackish estuary water from local marsh systems, were analyzed in situ for temperature in Celsius, salinity (which is the dissolved content of the water), dissolved oxygen (O2)concentration, and pH (which is the Hydrogen concentration) using sensors set at the surface and the bottom of the river. When any two of the four inorganic carbon variables have been measured the other two can be calculated using modeling. NDIR (Non-dispersive infrared) sensors that have been adapted from use in large scale factory settings to measure hazardous gases for use in the field now be used for in situ situations to measure CO2 fluctuations above the river’s surface. In addition to field measurements, grab samples were analyzed for pH in the laboratory using spectrophotometric techniques that rely on meta-cresol purple and a standard temperature of 25 degrees Celsius set by a water bath to determine pH. The in situ field test in marsh systems around the Armstrong area show strong correlations between water depth and the measurement parameters. At the river bottom, dissolved O2 concentrations were much lower than dissolved O2 at the river surface. These differences are only increased due to tidal influences which were observed to have a direct effect on all the variables by infusing marsh systems with sea water. During low tides it was found that the water systems would have high salinity values at the river bottom and low salinity at the surface highlighting the marsh systems ability to rapidly change.