Proposal Abstract

A primary assessment of instructor effectiveness is an end-of-course student evaluation survey where students use a scale to determine their degree of satisfaction with course content, teaching style, text book selection, etc. While effective in determining student satisfaction, they do not address possible pedagogical changes which could improve the effectiveness of the student learning experience in that class section. Periodic collection of feedback during a class enables a change in presentation methodology to more effectively present core material suited to the specific class of students. The issue is having the information TOO late to be effective in teaching current classes. This requires knowing NOW what is working for this specific class for effective learning. The variety of end-of-course or post-course surveys and evaluations commonly used primarily assess student satisfaction, not teaching effectiveness. And are “too little, too late” to effectively change curricula.

Location

Room 1909

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 9th, 4:00 PM Mar 9th, 4:45 PM

Get It While It's Hot. Are Your Students Getting It NOW?

Room 1909

A primary assessment of instructor effectiveness is an end-of-course student evaluation survey where students use a scale to determine their degree of satisfaction with course content, teaching style, text book selection, etc. While effective in determining student satisfaction, they do not address possible pedagogical changes which could improve the effectiveness of the student learning experience in that class section. Periodic collection of feedback during a class enables a change in presentation methodology to more effectively present core material suited to the specific class of students. The issue is having the information TOO late to be effective in teaching current classes. This requires knowing NOW what is working for this specific class for effective learning. The variety of end-of-course or post-course surveys and evaluations commonly used primarily assess student satisfaction, not teaching effectiveness. And are “too little, too late” to effectively change curricula.