Location

Room 100

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

The Libraries of Grand Valley State University (GVSU) crafted an Information Literacy Core Competencies document during fall 2008 for adoption by the larger GVSU community (http://main.gvsu.edu/library/information-literacy-core-competencies-168.htm). The philosophy of information literacy is embedded in all learning environments, but the term information literacy is most prevalent in the context of libraries. The competencies document was an attempt to clarify these concepts in a manner that speaks to the broader academic community. Every effort was made to use inclusive language and to make concepts applicable to a wide variety of academic disciplines. Focus groups were chosen as the lead vehicle to roll out the competencies to the GVSU community due to our culture of ground-up decision making and to allow us to incorporate faculty-driven suggestions before presenting the document to the University as a whole. The document has given librarians a unified focus and a shared language to promote the mission and vision of the University Libraries. In the same vein, each academic discipline has its own way of approaching information literacy. It is our hope that the competencies will give different academic disciplines a common language with which to approach what has been a tower of Babel. Information literacy should not be lost in translation. Attendees will hear what worked, and what needs work, when a large comprehensive university allows a faculty-driven initiative to define and implement a far-reaching information literacy guidance document.

Presentation Description

The Libraries of Grand Valley State University (GVSU) crafted an Information Literacy Core Competencies document during Fall 2008 for adoption by the larger GVSU community. The competencies document was an attempt to clarify information literacy concepts in a manner that speaks to the broader academic community using intentionally inclusive language. Attendees will hear what worked, and what needs work, when a large comprehensive university allows a faculty-driven initiative to define and implement a far-reaching information literacy guidance document. Our thanks to Jodi Tyron, Scholarly Communications Initiatives Coordinator at GVSU, for her co-authorship and work in preparing this presentation.

Keywords

Information literacy, Interdisciplinary approach in education, Academic libraries, Libraries and colleges

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 1st, 12:45 PM Oct 1st, 1:45 PM

Lost in Translation: Creating a Common Language for Information Literacy across Disciplines

Room 100

The Libraries of Grand Valley State University (GVSU) crafted an Information Literacy Core Competencies document during fall 2008 for adoption by the larger GVSU community (http://main.gvsu.edu/library/information-literacy-core-competencies-168.htm). The philosophy of information literacy is embedded in all learning environments, but the term information literacy is most prevalent in the context of libraries. The competencies document was an attempt to clarify these concepts in a manner that speaks to the broader academic community. Every effort was made to use inclusive language and to make concepts applicable to a wide variety of academic disciplines. Focus groups were chosen as the lead vehicle to roll out the competencies to the GVSU community due to our culture of ground-up decision making and to allow us to incorporate faculty-driven suggestions before presenting the document to the University as a whole. The document has given librarians a unified focus and a shared language to promote the mission and vision of the University Libraries. In the same vein, each academic discipline has its own way of approaching information literacy. It is our hope that the competencies will give different academic disciplines a common language with which to approach what has been a tower of Babel. Information literacy should not be lost in translation. Attendees will hear what worked, and what needs work, when a large comprehensive university allows a faculty-driven initiative to define and implement a far-reaching information literacy guidance document.