Conference Tracks

About SoTL – Analysis, synthesis, reflection, and discussion

Abstract

As teachers and as researchers, we engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) for a variety of reasons. These reasons are valuable to us – individually — in terms of driving positive change in our students’ learning or in our own teaching praxis. Without doubt, these local changes influenced by outcomes from SoTL work are important. One might wonder, though, how results and information gathered from these SoTL studies are valued by stakeholders across institutions and disciplines. To date, strong and consistent advocacy for SoTL has been the mechanism for this transfer from local to broader audiences. SoTL became an international, cross-disciplinary movement through the shared and dedicated advocacy of individuals and groups working to advance the profile and understanding of SoTL, its benefits, and its uses. While early advocacy has been effective in moving SoTL forward in a variety of ways (e.g., establishment of local and international SoTL societies, disciplinary SoTL awards, a wide variety of peer-review outlets for SoTL work), work is still needed. Indeed, advocacy for SoTL is necessary until the point when SoTL is clearly understood and valued across disciplines and institutions. SoTL advocacy starts with individual SoTL researchers and enthusiasts such as those at the SoTL Commons conference this week. Understanding that we all have a potential role in SoTL advocacy, this keynote presentation is framed by five important questions focused on ideas and practices for veteran and novice SoTL researchers:

  • Why is SoTL advocacy beyond the individual learning context necessary?
  • Who should be involved as a stakeholder in SoTL advocacy efforts?
  • When should SoTL advocacy be encouraged?
  • Where does SoTL advocacy take place?
  • How is effective SoTL advocacy accomplished?

Each question will be explored and discussed, with ideas for each member of the audience to take back to their own respective institutions and disciplines.

Session Format

Presentation

Location

Lunch

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Jan 24th, 12:00 PM Jan 24th, 2:00 PM

Who, When, Where, Why & How: Thoughts on SoTL Advocacy

Lunch

As teachers and as researchers, we engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) for a variety of reasons. These reasons are valuable to us – individually — in terms of driving positive change in our students’ learning or in our own teaching praxis. Without doubt, these local changes influenced by outcomes from SoTL work are important. One might wonder, though, how results and information gathered from these SoTL studies are valued by stakeholders across institutions and disciplines. To date, strong and consistent advocacy for SoTL has been the mechanism for this transfer from local to broader audiences. SoTL became an international, cross-disciplinary movement through the shared and dedicated advocacy of individuals and groups working to advance the profile and understanding of SoTL, its benefits, and its uses. While early advocacy has been effective in moving SoTL forward in a variety of ways (e.g., establishment of local and international SoTL societies, disciplinary SoTL awards, a wide variety of peer-review outlets for SoTL work), work is still needed. Indeed, advocacy for SoTL is necessary until the point when SoTL is clearly understood and valued across disciplines and institutions. SoTL advocacy starts with individual SoTL researchers and enthusiasts such as those at the SoTL Commons conference this week. Understanding that we all have a potential role in SoTL advocacy, this keynote presentation is framed by five important questions focused on ideas and practices for veteran and novice SoTL researchers:

  • Why is SoTL advocacy beyond the individual learning context necessary?
  • Who should be involved as a stakeholder in SoTL advocacy efforts?
  • When should SoTL advocacy be encouraged?
  • Where does SoTL advocacy take place?
  • How is effective SoTL advocacy accomplished?

Each question will be explored and discussed, with ideas for each member of the audience to take back to their own respective institutions and disciplines.