Title

The Ecologically Noble Savage or the Pursuit of an Ecological Identity in Luis Sepúlveda’s Environmental Novels

Subject Area

Spanish American Studies

Abstract

The main aim of this paper is to analyze the image of the indigenous people presented in Chilean writer Luis Sepúlveda’s three novels Un viejo que leía novelas de amor, Mundo del fin del mundo, and Yakaré, inquiring how the concept of the “ecologically noble savage” is reflected in these texts. Conservation biologist Kent H. Redford first introduced the concept of “ecologically noble savage,” and, according to Ter Ellingson, in this version of the myth of the noble savage the indigenous communities are perceived as human communities that can establish a truly harmonious relationship with the natural environment. This is due to their knowledge of the environment, which has allowed them to develop better methods to work and relate to the land than those used by non-indigenous communities. In Sepúlveda’s novels, this version of the noble savage is reproduced to propose an ecological identity that allows the human being to understand nature from an ecocentric perspective rather than an anthropocentric one.

Brief Bio Note

Claudia M. Páez-Lotero is a PhD student in the Spanish and Portuguese Program at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her field of specialization is in 20th-century Latin American literature, and her research interests include the ecological and environmental novel, fantasy literature, and the representation of space and place in literature.

Keywords

Luis Sepúlveda, environmental novel, ecologically noble savage, ecological identity

Location

Room 212

Presentation Year

2018

Start Date

4-5-2018 2:15 PM

Embargo

11-26-2017

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 5th, 2:15 PM

The Ecologically Noble Savage or the Pursuit of an Ecological Identity in Luis Sepúlveda’s Environmental Novels

Room 212

The main aim of this paper is to analyze the image of the indigenous people presented in Chilean writer Luis Sepúlveda’s three novels Un viejo que leía novelas de amor, Mundo del fin del mundo, and Yakaré, inquiring how the concept of the “ecologically noble savage” is reflected in these texts. Conservation biologist Kent H. Redford first introduced the concept of “ecologically noble savage,” and, according to Ter Ellingson, in this version of the myth of the noble savage the indigenous communities are perceived as human communities that can establish a truly harmonious relationship with the natural environment. This is due to their knowledge of the environment, which has allowed them to develop better methods to work and relate to the land than those used by non-indigenous communities. In Sepúlveda’s novels, this version of the noble savage is reproduced to propose an ecological identity that allows the human being to understand nature from an ecocentric perspective rather than an anthropocentric one.