Presentation Title

Dynamic Spectrum Access for Smart Communication Networks

Location

Atrium

Session Format

Poster Presentation

Research Area Topic:

Engineering and Material Sciences - Electrical

Co-Presenters, Co- Authors, Co-Researchers, Mentors, or Faculty Advisors

Johannes Reister

Danda B. Rawat, Ph.D.

Abstract

Wireless communication networks are the enabling technology behind smart phones, GPS receivers, Bluetooth devices, satellite TV, Wi-Fi, and many other technologies that have become ingrained in our society. The two main limiting resources in wireless communications are power and bandwidth but, while there are many methods for powering transceivers, the amount of usable bandwidth is a fixed physical quantity. Furthermore, the spectrum of usable bandwidth has been assigned by regulatory bodies, such as the FCC, for use by specific operators or services. This spectrum allocation has resulted in an unequal utilization of the available bandwidth, though spectrum occupancy surveys have shown that most licensed bands are utilizing less than 20% of their allocated resources even in large metropolitan areas. As the demand for certain services like Wi-Fi and cellular data grows, more bandwidth will be needed to accommodate the increased traffic volume.

One solution to this impending paucity of bandwidth is to allow unlicensed secondary users to communicate over underutilized licensed bands in a way that does not interfere with authorized primary users. In dynamic spectrum access secondary users can coexist with licensed primary users without creating harmful interference using a spectrum underlay approach of only transmitting with very low spectral power density. Similarly, with the spectrum overlay approach, secondary users can sense the spectrum to identify unused frequencies they can occupy without co-existing with primary users. In this paper, we explore how unlicensed wireless devices dynamically switch frequencies in a prototype implementation of a smart communication network with dynamic spectrum access operating in the ISM (Industrial, Scientific and Medical) and UNII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) bands that treats existing Wi-Fi networks as primary users in order to obtain experimental data without violating current FCC regulations.

This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under grant CNS-1405670.

Keywords

Dynamic spectrum access, Smart communication networks, Wireless networks, Cognitive radio networks

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Presentation Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Start Date

4-24-2015 10:45 AM

End Date

4-24-2015 12:00 PM

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Apr 24th, 10:45 AM Apr 24th, 12:00 PM

Dynamic Spectrum Access for Smart Communication Networks

Atrium

Wireless communication networks are the enabling technology behind smart phones, GPS receivers, Bluetooth devices, satellite TV, Wi-Fi, and many other technologies that have become ingrained in our society. The two main limiting resources in wireless communications are power and bandwidth but, while there are many methods for powering transceivers, the amount of usable bandwidth is a fixed physical quantity. Furthermore, the spectrum of usable bandwidth has been assigned by regulatory bodies, such as the FCC, for use by specific operators or services. This spectrum allocation has resulted in an unequal utilization of the available bandwidth, though spectrum occupancy surveys have shown that most licensed bands are utilizing less than 20% of their allocated resources even in large metropolitan areas. As the demand for certain services like Wi-Fi and cellular data grows, more bandwidth will be needed to accommodate the increased traffic volume.

One solution to this impending paucity of bandwidth is to allow unlicensed secondary users to communicate over underutilized licensed bands in a way that does not interfere with authorized primary users. In dynamic spectrum access secondary users can coexist with licensed primary users without creating harmful interference using a spectrum underlay approach of only transmitting with very low spectral power density. Similarly, with the spectrum overlay approach, secondary users can sense the spectrum to identify unused frequencies they can occupy without co-existing with primary users. In this paper, we explore how unlicensed wireless devices dynamically switch frequencies in a prototype implementation of a smart communication network with dynamic spectrum access operating in the ISM (Industrial, Scientific and Medical) and UNII (Unlicensed National Information Infrastructure) bands that treats existing Wi-Fi networks as primary users in order to obtain experimental data without violating current FCC regulations.

This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation (NSF) under grant CNS-1405670.