Title

Resilience Can Be Taught! 10 Tools to Motivate ANY Student

Location

Navarro

Focused Area

Improving School Climate for Youth-At-Risk

Relevance to Focused Area

Resilience is something we’re all born with – from the homeless person on the street to the Harvard business grad. Most of us – including many of our schools’ struggling students – just haven’t learned how to access what’s already inside of them. In this presentation, participants will learn about the vital skills of resilience and the 3 keys to creating a resilient climate. This engaging presentation will empower you to deliver these skills to students of any background and learning style, enabling them to thrive not only in school, but in life.

Primary Strand

Social & Emotional Skills

Relevance to Primary Strand

School Climate: Students improved social behavior and emotional health. Students showed less social stress and anxiety. Students improved self-concept and overall happiness. Students showed more internal control.

Academic Success: The average GPA increased. Academic progress improved in all areas. Youth perceived themselves as being more capable of learning.

Dropout Prevention: Students reduced failing grades by 47%. Students were three times more likely to graduate. Time spent implementing these strategies correlated with a reduced number of explosions. 90% of students reported increased motivation to keep trying.

Classroom Management: Students reported fewer emotional, attention, and rule-breaking problems. Students showed improved attitudes and motivation. Behavior incident reports decreased by 20%

Brief Program Description

Discover 10 tools to help you foster resilience in even the most unmotivated students. Whether you work with students one on one, in small groups, or in a classroom, this breakthrough presentation will give you skills to deliver resilience to students of ANY background and learning style.

Summary

Grit. Fortitude. Determination. Resilience. No matter what you call it, teachers and administrators nationwide agree that there has never been a greater need to teach our students how to thrive in school and in life. Studies have shown that students who score higher on resilience measures have improved social skills, higher grades, a greater love of learning, and better decision-making skills.

The breakthrough idea of this presentation is that resilience can be taught. In fact, it’s something we are all born with – from the homeless person on the street to the brightest Harvard professor. Most of us – including many of our schools’ most struggling students – just haven’t learned how to access what’s already inside. In this presentation, participants will learn about the vital skills of resilience. This engaging presentation will empower participants to deliver these skills to students of any background and learning style.

In this session, participants will be introduced to four sources of resilience that will help students learn to look at their problems differently. These four sources are:

  • Relational Resilience: The ability to draw motivation from the support of others and others’ dependence on you.
  • Street Resilience: Using disrespect, discrimination, and mistakes as fuel to propel you forward in life.
  • Resource Resilience: The recognition that resilience can be increased by accessing seen and unseen resources around you.
  • Rock Bottom Resilience: The belief in your ability, even when you’re at your lowest point, to change your circumstances, combat hopelessness, and fight on.

When students internalize the principles behind each of these sources, they are able to transform problems into positive motivation to help them succeed in school and post-secondary life.

This engaging presentation will use stories, activities, visual components, and other multisensory learning tools to demonstrate the power of transforming life’s inevitable negative situations into positive outcomes.

Following this presentation, participants will know how to build a belief in students that they can change their circumstances, no matter how hopeless. They will gain strategies to transform pain and adversity into fuel, and they will recognize and know how to utilize the resources for resilience that exist around them.

Evidence

With References:

Multiple third party studies have shown the solutions presented in this session have yielded these outcomes:

School Climate: Students improved social behavior and emotional health. Students showed less social stress and anxiety (Baker, 2008). Students improved self-concept and overall happiness (Bise, 2009). Students showed more internal control (Wilhite, 2010).

Academic Success: The average GPA increased by 11% (Knick, 2010). Academic progress improved in all areas (Acuña, 2008).Youth perceived themselves as being more capable of learning (Baker, 2008).

Dropout Prevention: Students reduced failing grades by 47% (Wymore, 2007). Students were three times more likely to graduate. Time spent implementing these strategies correlated with a reduced number of expulsions (Minor, 2009). 90% of students reported increased motivation to keep trying (Bird, 2010).

Classroom Management: Students reported fewer emotional, attention, and rule-breaking problems (Baker, 2008). Students showed improved attitudes and motivation. Behavior incident reports decreased by 20% (Knick, 2010).

Bullying Prevention: Students reduced fighting/aggressive behavior and harassment/bullying behavior. Students emotionally showed more internal control and less social stress and anxiety (Wilhite, 2010). Students had a 13% decrease in referrals and behavior problems (Williams, 2009).

References:

Wymore, Sherrie. “WhyTry? A Report of an After-School Tutoring Program.”The Counseling Interviewer 39.2 (Winter 2007): 9-13.

Baker. “Examining the Effectiveness of WhyTry Program for Children Receiving Residentially Based Services and Attending a Non-Public School.” Doctoral Dissertation, University of Southern California (2008).

Wilhite, Shannon, PhD. “Effects of the WhyTry Social Skills Program on

Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders at an Alternative Campus.” Doctoral Dissertation, University of North Texas (2010).

Minor. “Effectiveness of the WhyTry program in Working with Children with Conduct Disorders.” Doctoral dissertation, Argosy University, Sarasota, FL (2009).

Bird, Brandon. “WhyTry Evaluation Report 2006-2010.” Churchill County

Probation Report, Field Research (2010).

Mortenson, Bruce, Ph.D. and Rush, Karena, Ph.D. “PRIDE: 28-day Summer Program for At-Risk Students.” Research Committee at Towson University (Oct. 2007).

Acuña, Vega, Meza, Marquez, & Vera. “Outcome Evaluation Methods and Results for the South Los Angeles Resiliency (SOLAR) Project” (Apr. 2008).

Williams, Leigh. “Horizon Middle School Mental Health, Counseling, and PBS Effective Education, Recipe for Success.” Field Research (2009).

Knick, Tammy. “WhyTry? A Program Evaluation.” Poster Presentation, Minnesota State University (2010).

Bise, Nita. “WhyTry Group Results.” Field Research, CO (2009).

WhyTry Program Results. Wicomico County School District. Wicomico

County, Maryland (2012).

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Christian Moore is an internationally-renowned speaker, licensed clinical social

worker, and advocate for youth. He is the author of The Resilience Breakthrough: 27

Tools for Turning Adversity into Action, a guide for accessing resilience in a world of

increasing instability and narrowing opportunity; and founder of the WhyTry

Program.

Coming from a blended family of 12 children, Christian spent most of his childhood

years on the streets. In a neighborhood just outside of Washington, D.C., he was

exposed to a wide array of social problems, which opened his eyes to the many

injustices that exist in our world today.

By the time Christian had reached second grade, he had been diagnosed with

Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder, conduct disorder, and severe learning

disabilities. Because of these setbacks, he often felt socially isolated in school.

He spent time both as bully and victim; and often acted out to avoid answering the

questions of teachers.

Due to his poor grades and learning disabilities, high school counselors informed

Christian that college was not a viable option. But after graduation, an experience

volunteering in the inner city gave him a drive to help others and a reason to try.

Christian found his passion in social work. In college, he developed what he called

his “No F” game plan, enabling him to rise from a “troubled” special education

student to a well-respected recipient of a master’s degree in social work.

As a social worker in education, youth corrections, and a homeless program,

Christian began to see the need for a new approach in reaching out to today’s youth.

Drawing from his personal challenges, his degree, his career, and his understanding

of people from all walks of life, Christian created the WhyTry Program.

Christian’s presentation provides people with the specific tools necessary to develop

resilience in the face of life’s challenges.

Start Date

10-27-2017 9:45 AM

End Date

10-27-2017 11:00 AM

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Oct 27th, 9:45 AM Oct 27th, 11:00 AM

Resilience Can Be Taught! 10 Tools to Motivate ANY Student

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Discover 10 tools to help you foster resilience in even the most unmotivated students. Whether you work with students one on one, in small groups, or in a classroom, this breakthrough presentation will give you skills to deliver resilience to students of ANY background and learning style.