Title

Compassion Fatigue versus Compassion Satisfaction

First Presenter's Institution

Pinnacle Behavioral Health

Second Presenter's Institution

Pinnacle Behavioral Health

Third Presenter's Institution

N/A

Fourth Presenter's Institution

N/A

Fifth Presenter's Institution

N/A

Location

Session 2 (Westbrook)

Strand #1

Mental & Physical Health

Strand #2

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

Being successful in our profession of working with at risk children and teens does not come without emotional exhaustion, constant exposure to secondary trauma, and burnout/ compassion fatigue. This presentation will increase our chances of compassion satisfaction by understanding how to recognize compassion fatigue and taking the necessary steps to balance personal life and professional stressors.

Brief Program Description

As helping professionals we strive to serve others in ways that empower them to improve quality of life through creating the opportunity for change, bring order to chaos, and ease/heal suffering and pain. However, being successful in this profession does not come without emotional exhaustion, constant exposure to secondary trauma, and burnout/ compassion fatigue. This presentation will increase our chances of compassion satisfaction by understanding how to recognize compassion fatigue and taking the necessary steps to balance personal life and professional stressors.

Summary

As helping professionals we strive to serve others in ways that empower them to improve quality of life through creating the opportunity for change, bring order to chaos, and ease/heal suffering and pain. However, being successful in this profession does not come without emotional exhaustion, constant exposure to secondary trauma, and burnout/ compassion fatigue. This presentation will increase our chances of compassion satisfaction by understanding how to recognize compassion fatigue and taking the necessary steps to balance personal life and professional stressors.

Why? Current studies suggest that it is important to find ways of decreasing burnout and compassion fatigue among professionals that work with at-risk youth. Burnout has been shown to impact the work environment adversely, which adversely impacts our youth. At-risk youth need us to be emotionally ready to empower them to improve their lives.

In order to improve the work environment requires an understanding of the commonalities of compassion fatigue, what our brains look like on stress, the neurological and physical responses and pathways to wellness.

Objectives

1. Attendees will leave with with identifiers for emotional exhaustion and compassion fatigue.

2. Professionals will increase their knowledge about the steps to take to balance personal life and professional stressors.

Evidence

•The American Institute of Stress: Ft. Worth, TX www.stress.org

•Compassionfatigue.org •www.isu.edu/-bhstamm (the professional quality of life scale)

•Patricia Smith: Compassion Satisfaction: 50 Steps to Healthy Caregiving

•Patricia Smith: To Weep For a Stranger: Compassion Fatigue in Caregiving

•Lipsky Dermoot and Laura Burk: Trauma Stewardship: An everyday guide to Caring for self While Caring for Others.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Angel Daniels is an Associate Licensed Counselor and a member of the clinical team at Elk River Treatment Program for adolescents. Ms. Daniels earned a master’s degree in Counseling at Faulkner University. Her work experience includes positions as a mental health and substance abuse counselor for children and adults in outpatient and residential settings, including individuals who were incarcerated.Clients enter treatment with various backgrounds and circumstances. With motivation and guidance from a mental health professional, every client can develop the skills, abilities and strengths to reach a place of healing and recovery. Ms. Daniels supports Elk River’s philosophy of tailoring treatment plans to meet the individual needs of each client.

Mr. Wolfe graduated from the University of Wyoming with a degree in English. He worked at an experiential education center/ropes course facility run by George Mason University before joining Elk River Treatment Program where he has served as a group leader, assistant program director and now program director. Mr. Wolfe is certified as a Wilderness First Responder and a “Leave No Trace” Master Educator. He is also certified in Satori Alternatives to Managing Aggression (SAMA). Bo Wolfe has lived in Alabama, Tennessee, Colorado, Wyoming, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. While in Wyoming, he developed his interest in white water rafting, mountain biking, and rock climbing. He has been active in backpacking and canoeing for most of his life.

Keyword Descriptors

compassion, burnout, stress, self-care, at-risk, professionals, trauma, emotional

Presentation Year

2020

Start Date

3-9-2020 1:15 PM

End Date

3-9-2020 2:30 PM

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Mar 9th, 1:15 PM Mar 9th, 2:30 PM

Compassion Fatigue versus Compassion Satisfaction

Session 2 (Westbrook)

As helping professionals we strive to serve others in ways that empower them to improve quality of life through creating the opportunity for change, bring order to chaos, and ease/heal suffering and pain. However, being successful in this profession does not come without emotional exhaustion, constant exposure to secondary trauma, and burnout/ compassion fatigue. This presentation will increase our chances of compassion satisfaction by understanding how to recognize compassion fatigue and taking the necessary steps to balance personal life and professional stressors.