Title

Reaching The Heart of Generation X, Y n Z by means of A Healthy Awareness of Emotional Intelligence

First Presenter's Institution

Dalton State College

Second Presenter's Institution

NA

Third Presenter's Institution

NA

Fourth Presenter's Institution

NA

Fifth Presenter's Institution

NA

Location

Harborside East & West

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Mental & Physical Health

Relevance

As we aim to educate this generation of learners, we must remember that instructor effectiveness begins by reaching the heart of his/her learners. Reaching the heart of learners includes modeling and fostering emotional and social skills such as effective communication, ability to understand, inspire, trust and motivate. Promoting these facets leads to developing the total mental health of learners.

Brief Program Description

Reaching the heart of generation Z can be done by maximizing our emotional intelligence. As leaders, educators and role models we must understand what A Healthy Awareness of Emotional Intelligence looks like.

Summary

Are you an emotionally intelligent educator who engages your students in the journey of learning? Teaching today must be done differently than it’s been done in years past. We must reach our generation Z learners who come from different environments, backgrounds and circumstances. The way you teach will affect student achievement, hence our need as educators to develop emotional awareness and interpersonal skills that will enable us to manage our classrooms and stimulate student success. There are very practical reasons to promote social and emotional learning in schools, from kindergarten through college. The EI of children starts developing long before they ever enter a classroom.

This presentation is based on Daniel Goleman’s (1998) five components of emotional intelligence (self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, social awareness, and relationship management) and Mayer & Salovey’s (1997) four branch model (perceiving, using, understanding and managing emotions) of emotional intelligence assisting educators in seeing the importance of emotional intelligence. , this workshop will show teachers how increase their effectiveness in the classroom.

The more you harness the skill of becoming an emotionally intelligent instructor, the more your students will learn and harness their own emotionally intelligence. This interactive presentation that focuses on Goleman’s five components of emotional intelligence and Mayer & Salovey’s four branch model will most certainly help educators increase their own emotional intelligence that will lead to a better learning environment for everyone.

Evidence

Emotional intelligence is the ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions, to discriminate among them, and to use this information to guide one's thinking and action. Salovey and Mayer (1989). Studies and research have shown that individuals with high emotional intelligence (EI) have greater mental health, learning and performance productivity, and leadership skills. Daniel Goleman (2006), indicated that EI accounted for 67% of the abilities deemed necessary for greater performance in leaders, and mattered twice as much as technical expertise or IQ. According to Goleman (2006), people in helping professions must work hard to ensure that rapport exists, otherwise time is wasted and learning and developing is at a minimum.

There are currently several models of EI. Goleman's original model may now be considered a mixed model that combines what have subsequently been modeled separately as ability EI and trait EI. Goleman defined EI as the array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance. The ability model, developed by Peter Salovey and John Mayer in 2002, focuses on the individual's ability to process emotional information and use it to navigate the social environment. The Ruven Bar-On is another widely used EI inventor test that is widely used.

Bar-On, R. (2004). The Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i): Rationale, description and summary of psychometric properties. In G. Geher (Ed.), Measuring Emotional Intelligence: Common Ground and Controversy (pp. 115145). New York: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

Goleman, D. (2006), Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships.

Goleman, D. (2006). Emotional Intelligence: Why it Can Matter More than IQ. New York: Bantam Books.

Salovey, P.; Mayer, J.D. (1989). "Emotional intelligence". Imagination, Cognition, and Personality. 9 (3): 185–211.

Mayer, J. D., Salovey, P., & Caruso, D. R. (2002). Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) Userʹs manual. Toronto: Multi-Health

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Robert L. Overstreet, Assistant Dean for the School of Education at Dalton State College. Dr. Overstreet received his PhD in Leadership from Andrews University in 2016. His central focus of study was on the topic of Emotional Intelligence. Dr. Overstreet received training and certification from the Yale Center of Emotional Intelligence. Dr. Overstreet has served as an executive coach for authors, medical professionals, corporate leaders and youth. Dr. Overstreet spent the first 20 years of his profession as a classroom teacher, elementary and high school principal.

Keyword Descriptors

Emotional Intelligence, Self-awareness, Self-regulation, Social awareness, Relationship management

Presentation Year

2017

Start Date

3-7-2017 4:00 PM

End Date

3-7-2017 5:30 PM

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Mar 7th, 4:00 PM Mar 7th, 5:30 PM

Reaching The Heart of Generation X, Y n Z by means of A Healthy Awareness of Emotional Intelligence

Harborside East & West

Reaching the heart of generation Z can be done by maximizing our emotional intelligence. As leaders, educators and role models we must understand what A Healthy Awareness of Emotional Intelligence looks like.