Title

The Impact of Classroom Performance System Technology upon Student Motivation and Achievement in the 11th Grade Advanced Algebra Classrooms

Location

Harborside Center

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

The analysis and findings from the study presented several practical recommendations for future classroom performance system (CPS) implementation and research. Lively (2010) recommended that teachers should be more comfortable to incorporate CPS into their daily instruction. Lively also stated that training needs to take place so that teachers become more competent in utilizing technology in the classrooms. Although the results of no significant differences among the CPS and non-CPS groups were presented, teachers should be encouraged to still implement the use of CPS in the discourse of teaching and learning mathematics. The implementation of CPS allows teachers to professionally grow as they find different ways to develop their teaching strategies. Of course, by implementing CPS in the classrooms, teachers at least meet the ISTE’s (2006) requirement of preparing, utilizing, and providing technology-supported learning opportunities for all learners.

Brief Program Description

The implementation of CPS in Advanced Algebra classrooms offered a different perspective in how classroom teacher and students interacted in the discourse of teaching and learning. Students felt more eager to answer the questions anonymously, and the teacher could provide instant feedback to students. Furthermore, the implementation of CPS into daily lessons required teacher to prepare with rigorous questions at the end of each lesson. Doing so allows teacher to maintain the rigor of the mathematics curriculum and to meet the mathematical objectives at the end of the year. At the same time, the implementation of CPS from this study in teaching and learning allows the researchers and teachers to continue exploring other strategies to implement along with the use of CPS in the classrooms.

Summary

Given the implementation of classroom performance system (CPS) in teaching and learning has many positive benefits, current literature indicates that the results vary at different levels of instruction as to whether or not the implementation of CPS technology actually affects student achievement or is only perceived to affect student achievement in mathematics. Since much of the research has been conducted on CPS technology at the postsecondary level in different content areas, a gap in the research indicates the need to examine the impact of CPS implementation in the K-12 mathematics setting. The main purpose of this current study was to examine the impact of CPS-based instruction on student motivation and achievement in the 11th grade Advanced Algebra classrooms. Although the results of the findings showed a no significant difference, the study provided classroom teachers and district personnel with valuable evidences besides how effective classroom performance systems are on student motivation and achievement in mathematics classroom. This is extremely important as mathematics teachers face the challenges of interactively and actively engaging students in the discourse of learning.

Evidence

Procedure

Permission. This study was carried out as an in-school investigation. Therefore, the researcher had obtained permission from the Clayton County Public Schools Research Review Board (see Appendices D and E) and from the Georgia Southern University Institutional Review Board (IRB) prior to the start of data collection. Testing and scoring are essential parts of an ongoing teaching and learning process; however, to meet the federal and state guidelines in terms of student privacy and anonymity of educational records, participants received parental consent and minor assent forms (see Appendices F and G) which gave the researcher teacher the permission to use the students’ data for this study.

Assessment administration. At the beginning of Unit 5-Mathematical Modeling, the EOCT performance score from the previous year was gathered to determine the initial achievement score level for each individual. The researcher then implemented the use of CPS in two randomly selected Advanced Algebra classes during the duration of the study while maintaining the traditional teaching strategies in the control groups. However, both control and treatment groups received the same explicit instruction from the researcher teacher using the Georgia mandated curriculum framework and pacing guide from the district.

Each participant in the treatment groups received the password code that was auto-generated by the iRespond system to log into the clicker. Each individual in the treatment groups was guided on how to use and maneuver around with clickers. Participants in the treatment groups used clickers to answer questions posed before, during, and after the instruction of each lesson. iRespond system allowed teacher to select or advance what questions the students needed to answer formative assessment from the PowerPoint. As opposed to teacher pace, student pace could also be used to allow students to respond to the formative and summative questions within the allotted time on their own.

At the conclusion of the unit, the posttest was administered to both control and treatment groups. To ensure the consistency and validity of the study, participants in the control and treatment group recorded their responses on the Scantron. Also, at the end of the unit before grades were returned, participants in both groups took the IMMS via an embedded form on Edmodo in a positive, safe, and nonthreatening atmosphere in their math classrooms. Although participants had to log into their Edmodo accounts to access the survey, their identity and names were not attached to the survey results. To reduce bias and the validity of the study, the researcher teacher was not in the room when the participants responded to the survey questions.

Data Analysis and Results: Student Achievement

ANCOVA. A one-way ANCOVA was conducted using SPSS to examine if there was a significant difference in the Unit 5 posttest score between 11th grades who received CPS based mathematics instructions as opposed to those who received non-CPS-based mathematics instructions. The implementation of CPS in the teaching and learning discourse served as the independent variable and included two levels: 11th graders who received CPS based mathematics instruction and those who received non-CPS based mathematics instruction. The dependent variable was the Unit 5 posttest score. The previous year EOCT score served as the covariate.

Data Analysis and Results: Student Motivation

ANCOVA. A one-way ANCOVA was conducted using SPSS to examine if there was a significant difference in the four category scores and an overall motivation score of the IMMS survey between 11th grades who received CPS based mathematics instructions as opposed to those who received non-CPS-based mathematics instructions. The implementation of CPS in the teaching and learning discourse served as the independent variable and included two levels: 11th graders who received CPS based mathematics instruction and those who received non-CPS based mathematics instruction. The dependent variables were the four post-survey subcategory and the overall motivation mean scores collected from the IMMS survey. The pre-survey category and overall motivation mean scores from the IMMS served as the covariates.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Michael Nguyen-Quan is a secondary mathematics teacher at Forest Park High School in Clayton County Public School. He spent two years teaching at Beach High School in Savannah, GA before relocating to FPHS. He has taught Mathematics I - IV as well as the newly adopted courses, such as Coordinate Algebra, Analytic Geometry, and Advanced Algebra. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in Teaching and Learning with a concentration in Mathematics Education at Georgia State University. His research interest involves with the implementation of technology in teaching and learning mathematics, student motivation and achievement in learning mathematics with technology, and professional development.

Keyword Descriptors

cps, classroom performance system, mathematics, teaching and learning, integration, technology, secondary education, research method, assessments, curriculum and instruction

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-8-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

3-8-2016 5:30 PM

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Mar 8th, 4:00 PM Mar 8th, 5:30 PM

The Impact of Classroom Performance System Technology upon Student Motivation and Achievement in the 11th Grade Advanced Algebra Classrooms

Harborside Center

The implementation of CPS in Advanced Algebra classrooms offered a different perspective in how classroom teacher and students interacted in the discourse of teaching and learning. Students felt more eager to answer the questions anonymously, and the teacher could provide instant feedback to students. Furthermore, the implementation of CPS into daily lessons required teacher to prepare with rigorous questions at the end of each lesson. Doing so allows teacher to maintain the rigor of the mathematics curriculum and to meet the mathematical objectives at the end of the year. At the same time, the implementation of CPS from this study in teaching and learning allows the researchers and teachers to continue exploring other strategies to implement along with the use of CPS in the classrooms.