Title

Supporting Leadership Development of At-Risk High School Females: The Young Women LEAD Initiative

Location

Harborside Center

Strand #1

Social & Emotional Skills

Strand #2

Family & Community

Relevance

In this interactive presentation, the presenter will share the outcomes and lessons learned from a 5-year collaborative project aimed at meeting the social-emotional and career development needs of at-risk high school females. The Young Women LEAD Conference is a collaborative effort between prominent female business leaders, a women's career development organization, a regional university and community college. 1,000 high school girls from at-risk backgrounds attend this annual event focused on developing the girls' leadership skills and career awareness.

Brief Program Description

This presentation will feature outcomes and lessons learned from 5 years of the collaborative Young Women LEAD Conference for at-risk high school girls. Young Women LEAD is a collaborative conference that provides high school girls with meaningful experiences designed to help them discover their innate qualities and strengths and to challenge them to reach higher levels of personal growth and development. Conference participants attend a variety of interactive discussion panels and breakout sessions. The conference is a collaborative effort between prominent businesswomen, local high schools, a regional university, and a community college.

Summary

Outcomes and lessons learned from five years of collaboration will be shared with participants. Specifics such as recruiting presenters, selecting conference themes, student registrations, etc. will be shared with the aim of assisting others in duplicating this successful endeavor. In addition, suggestions for regional collaboration between school districts, institutions of higher education, and business and community leaders will be shared. The purpose of the presentation will be to share our successes as well as lessons learned over time.

Evidence

The presenter will share the outcomes and lessons learned from 5 years of offering the Young Women LEAD conference through a collaborative effort of a regional university, community college, local school districts, and community and business leaders. Survey evaluation results from 5,000 students who have attended the conferences as well as suggestions for conference replication and future development will be shared with attendees. This collaborative venture aims to develop leadership and personal skills development in at-risk high school females as well as connect these students with successful female business and community leaders.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dr. Kimberly Clayton-Code is a professor of gifted and talented education in the College of Education and Human Services at Northern Kentucky University. Kimberly enjoys writing curriculum focused on economics and personal finance for K-12 students and adults. Four of her works have won national awards from both educational and professional business associations. She joined NKU in 2001 and holds degrees from the University of Louisville, NKU, and Purdue University.

Keyword Descriptors

leadership development; at-risk teens; career development

Presentation Year

2016

Start Date

3-8-2016 4:00 PM

End Date

3-8-2016 5:30 PM

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Mar 8th, 4:00 PM Mar 8th, 5:30 PM

Supporting Leadership Development of At-Risk High School Females: The Young Women LEAD Initiative

Harborside Center

This presentation will feature outcomes and lessons learned from 5 years of the collaborative Young Women LEAD Conference for at-risk high school girls. Young Women LEAD is a collaborative conference that provides high school girls with meaningful experiences designed to help them discover their innate qualities and strengths and to challenge them to reach higher levels of personal growth and development. Conference participants attend a variety of interactive discussion panels and breakout sessions. The conference is a collaborative effort between prominent businesswomen, local high schools, a regional university, and a community college.