Title

Increasing Elementary Math Achievement in Low Performing Schools Using Data from Curriculum-Based Measures.

Location

Harborside Center East and West

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

This proposal is related to Strands: 1. Reducing the achievement gap, and 2. Academic instruction (reading, writing, mathematics, or science) for students at risk of failure. New research on the use of curriculum based measures to increase individual and school wide math achievement in low performing elementary schools is now available to the practitioner and school leader. Low math achievement has plagued many low performing elementary schools over the years. This proposal links the issue of achievement gap and the critical issue of math instruction in our low performing elementary schools. This presentation will address this need and participants will gain both insights and tools, based on research, to more effectively address the need for improving student math achievement.

Brief Program Description

How effective are the tools available to teachers and school leaders to increase student math achievement in low performing elementary schools? New research on the use of curriculum based measures can provide valuable data for increasing individual and overall school math achievement. The researchers will share these findings and in turn share important insights and techniques for increasing math performance.

Summary

In summary, the persistent challenge to increase math achievement in low performing elementary schools is a lingering chronic obstacle for teachers and school leaders. Using data to predict student achievement and student needs is essential in any effort to effectively deal with this challenge. The need to better understand the effectiveness of these tools prompted the presenters to investigate the effectiveness of the practice of using curriculum based measures when trying to predict and increase student math achievement at low performing elementary schools. The results of this study can now better inform teachers and school leaders on the application of this tool for data gathering and increasing student achievement in mathematics. Participants in this presentation will be provided with study results and practices associated with their use. The participants will receive instruction on how to apply the models employed in the study to include practices proven to be viable and effective. Copies of specific data gathering tools and procedures and practices for the use of the tools will be shared. The study results have been gathered in cooperation with district practitioners and university researchers. The audience will have the opportunity to ask questions of persons with different perspectives giving a more balanced view of applying the insights and knowledge gained from the study. In addition, participants will have access to the presenters for questions once the conference is over. Participants will be encouraged to contact the study participants and seek technical assistance once they return to their work sites.

Evidence

The initial efforts to learn more about the use of curriculum based measures grew into a formal dissertation. Ten elementary schools within 5 Georgia school districts were identified for the study. Each of the ten schools all used the same mathematics curriculum-based measure. In order to determine if this mathematics curriculum-based measure could predict mathematics achievement on the Georgia state mathematics assessment, simple linear regression was calculated. Similar studies have been conducted using reading curriculum based measures to predict reading achievement on state assessments, but few studies have been conducted using mathematics curriculum based measures since it is a relatively new assessment. Previous studies examining the predictive value of reading curriculum based measures concluded that these scores were significantly related to state accountability test scores and can be used to predict student performance on state assessments (Crawford, Tindal, & Stieber, 2001; Merino & Beckman, 2010; Silberglitt, Burns, Madyun, & Lail, 2006;Wiley & Deno, 2005). Research supports the fact that curriculum based measures have high technical adequacy. The measures have high reliability and validity because they are devised with standard development, administration and scoring procedures. Curriculum-based measurement has evolved over the past 30 years, and can now be generated, administered and even scored through computer software programs. This timely administration and scoring of curriculum based measures provide teachers with valuable student data to be used for screening, differentiating instruction, progress monitoring, and overall teacher decision-making that impacts student achievement

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Mrs. Amy Chafin is the Curriculum and Assessment Director for the Worth County School District in Georgia. She has served her professional career in the K-12 public school setting. Mrs. Chafin’s professional experiences include serving as a middle and high school English teacher, a school improvement coordinator at the middle school level, and a K-12 Curriculum and Assessment Director. She received the Outstanding Curriculum and Instruction Doctoral Student Award at Valdosta State University in 2014.

Dr. Robert Green is an Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at Valdosta State University. His school site experiences include serving as a guidance counselor, school administrator and school principal. He was recognized as an Outstanding Principal by the Florida Department of Education. He served for five years with the State of Florida coordinating leadership development for the State of Florida via the Florida Council on Educational Management. He has served for years as a mentor to new principals and principals at failing schools. His book Natural Forces: How to Significantly Increase Student Achievement in the Third Millennium focuses on systems thinking and leadership development and has sold in the thousands.

Dr. Rudo Tsemunhu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Leadership at Valdosta State University. She has international school site experience that includes serving as a, school principal in Zimbabwe and program coordinator for an educational initiative in Boston, MA.

Dr. Kathy Nobles is the Director of Administration of the Liberty County School District in Florida. She has experience as a classroom teacher, school media specialist and school principal. Other experiences include the Florida Department of Education as a regional data coach and the state data captain, and four years with the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) as a consultant providing professional development and technical assistance to districts in the panhandle region.

Dr. Lantry L. Brockmeier is a Professor in the Department of Curriculum, Leadership, and Technology at Valdosta State University. His professional experiences include being a middle school health educator, high school Biology teacher, evaluator, and psychometrician for a statewide testing program. Dr. Brockmeier's research interests include educational measurement, and research.

Dr. Bill Truby is an Assistant Professor at Valdosta State University in the Department of Educational Leadership. He is a retired professional educator with 43 years of experience: teacher, coach, assistant principal, associate principal, athletic director, head master, adjunct professor and school system superintendent for 8 years in Lamar County, GA. He has lead start-up schools and low-achieving schools and districts to higher levels of success and new standards of excellence. He has authored 2 books and has provided columns on education for newspapers for years. He has been a sought-after speaker throughout his career on a variety of topics, especially those dealing with leadership, motivation, and ethics.

Keyword Descriptors

Achievement Gap, Mathematics, Curriculum Based Measures, Academic Instruction, low performing schools, Tools for Teachers, New Research

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-3-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

3-3-2015 5:30 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 4:00 PM Mar 3rd, 5:30 PM

Increasing Elementary Math Achievement in Low Performing Schools Using Data from Curriculum-Based Measures.

Harborside Center East and West

How effective are the tools available to teachers and school leaders to increase student math achievement in low performing elementary schools? New research on the use of curriculum based measures can provide valuable data for increasing individual and overall school math achievement. The researchers will share these findings and in turn share important insights and techniques for increasing math performance.