Title

Can Spelling Be Remediated? Yes! But It Requires a Constructivist Approach

Location

Percival

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Relevance

The proposal relates to the strand, “Head”: Academic Achievement & Leadership. More specifically, it directly addresses the sub-topic: Closing achievement gaps and promoting learning for all children and youth especially for high-poverty populations. Helping students become excellent spellers by using the constructivist approach introduced in this presentation is important educationally. It provides an effective tool for helping students eliminate barriers created by their poor spelling abilities. The negative impression generated in the minds of readers of their misspelled communication sometimes creates an environment in which their ideas are not given due consideration or, in the worst case, may not be taken seriously. Readers of papers with misspelled words may even jump to a conclusion that poor spellers aren’t very smart. Perhaps more importantly, poor spelling ability often constitutes a constraint in written communication. Poor spellers often use a strategy of choosing words they can spell rather than choosing the words that best express their thinking. The presentation is also important scientifically because the methodology presented is supported by interactive constructivism—a learning model that, due to its implicit nature, is essential for procedural learning (such as how to spell) but not always used when designing curriculum.

Brief Program Description

Spelling ability seems to be something that students either have or they don't have. Attempts to improve spelling through memorizing word lists or studying word origins have little effect. Learn about an innovative, constructivist-based approach that works quickly to remediate spelling problems and how you can implement it in your classroom.

Summary

This presentation explores a non-traditional way of transforming poor spellers to excellent. Many educators have been frustrated with the lack of success they have experienced in trying to create ways to help their students become better spellers. Those educators will be interested in this presentation. The session will be composed of eight parts: Background to the development of a constructivist model of spelling Why remediate spelling? Why is it important? What doesn't work? What do excellent spellers do? How can we get poor spellers to do what excellent spellers do? (or, What does work?) Results Why does the constructivist model work? Analyzing the student materials and the implementation guidelines so participants can implement the model in their own classrooms Participants will: Know how to remediate spelling problems Understand the power and necessity of a constructivist model for procedural learning, including spelling Become familiar enough with the methodology of the constructivist model for developing spelling ability to utilize the model with their students

Evidence

Classroom research: The constructivist spelling model that will be presented has been implemented successfully with college students, high school students, eighth grade students, and fourth grade students. Evaluation results will be presented.

Format

Individual Presentation

Biographical Sketch

Dee Tadlock earned a Ph.D. in reading education in 1978. She has taught reading at every level from elementary school through graduate school and is currently adjunct faculty at Central Washington University. She is also President and Director of Research and Development for Read Right Systems, a consulting company in Washington State. She is the developer of two different intervention models, both based on interactive constructivism: Read Right and Spell Right, both of which reflect paradigm shifts in their respective fields. Tadlock has been published in Journal of Reading, Phi Delta Kappan, Reading Psychology, and Adult Literacy & Basic Education. She is author of the book, Read Right! Coaching Your Child to Excellence in Reading, published by McGraw-Hill in 2005 and was nominated for the Brock Prize for Innovation in Education, placing third out of nine nominees.

Keyword Descriptors

Spelling, constructivist, intervention, remediation

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-2-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

3-2-2015 11:45 AM

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Mar 2nd, 10:30 AM Mar 2nd, 11:45 AM

Can Spelling Be Remediated? Yes! But It Requires a Constructivist Approach

Percival

Spelling ability seems to be something that students either have or they don't have. Attempts to improve spelling through memorizing word lists or studying word origins have little effect. Learn about an innovative, constructivist-based approach that works quickly to remediate spelling problems and how you can implement it in your classroom.