Location

Harborside Center East and West

Strand #1

Academic Achievement & School Leadership

Strand #2

Social & Emotional Skills

Relevance

The proposal connects academic achievement and relationships both social and emotional. They are all interrelated and must take place to reach students who struggle emotionally. Title 1 schools have students with real issues, and real problems at home. Those basic needs must be met and understood before learning can truly take place. My proposal with connect with all strands in the following.ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT & LEADERSHIP CLOSING ACHIEVEMENT GAPS AND PROMOTING LEARNING FOR ALL CHILDREN AND YOUTH ESPECIALLY FOR HIGH-POVERTY POPULATIONS. SOME POSSIBLE TOPICS: (preference given to topics relevant to Title I educators and students): Effective school leadership for Title I schools; Success stories of Title I educators, Reducing achievement gaps; Turning around low-performing schools; High-performing, high-poverty schools; Common core standards; Academic instruction (reading, writing, mathematics, or science) for students at risk of failure; Effective use of student data; Differentiated instruction; Brain-based instruction; Instructional technology; Dropout prevention; Postsecondary readiness; Career readiness; Early intervention; Alternative schools; Afterschool programs; Summer programs; Inclusion; Special education; English language learner instruction. II. SOCIAL & EMOTIONAL SKILLS FOSTERING SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL SKILLS AND THE SOCIAL CLIMATE FOR ALL CHILDREN AND CHILDREN ESPECIALLY FOR HIGH-POVERTY POPULATIONS. SOME POSSIBLE TOPICS: School climate; Cultural diversity; Creating a sense of community in classrooms & schools; Caring curriculum; Achievement motivation; Academic resilience; Student empowerment; Student leadership skills; Character education; Self-Esteem; Positive identity development, Cooperative learning; Multicultural education; Life skills; Emotional intelligence; Communication skills; Decision making; Goal setting skills

Brief Program Description

The Cards of Life, when all hope is gone; trust then believe forces educators to view students differently. The notion that we can’t teach students until we truly begin to know them and they begin to trust us is challenged. The fact that our actions have to align with our words and meaningful conversations and relationships must be established in the classroom. At Risk or At Potential? Every school across the nation have students that struggle, academically, socially or behaviorally. There are a variety of reasons as to why? We can no longer ignore these students and pad the numbers to reflect a great school if all students are not being successful. As administrators, teachers, staff and community support members become involved, it has been clear that the child labeled AT RISK could be viewed as a child AT POTENTIAL.

If we looked at these students with a positive tag rather than a negative one, it is highly likely that we would have a different outlook and expectations for their futures.

Summary

My presentation will have administrators and educators evaluate their Culture, Mission and Vision of organization – What you want to accomplish in your organization and how you are going to do it. Everyone in the building should know your mission and vision Environment – clean, safe, secure, supportive, and mutually respectful Teachers/Staff – understanding, firm, fair, consistent, connections with kids, instructional alignment, no weak links and they must build positive relationships first before educational connections can take place. Relationship building amongst everyone is a must. Peers – outlets, supervised, accountable, clear, role models and mentors/student engagement and achievement Data – know your numbers, look often and allow the data to drive the decision making Proactive Solutions – PBS, school wide initiatives, Emotional Needs – counseling and support strategies to meet the needs of your population, address the issues Research Based – Educational programs, great instructors, don’t allow slacking, accountability for growth and gains Demographics – match your student populations in all areas, diversity, home, school and community The Power of One- For many at risk students, it only takes one person who truly cares to give them the tools to be successful to make a significant difference in the lives of a child. Handouts and points to ponder will be distributed as well as hands on interactive activities.

Evidence

According to International Education Research and research based strategies combining appropriate levels of dominance and cooperation, it is necessary for teachers to build positive relationships and classroom dynamics. International Journal of Educational Research – Robert J. Marzano and Jana S. Marzano By using research-based strategies combining appropriate levels of dominance and cooperation and an awareness of student needs, teachers can build positive classroom dynamics.

Format

Poster Presentation

Biographical Sketch

I am Dr. Erica Pooler founder of Erica Pooler & Associates and I currently work districts and judicial departments who serve students labeled as ESE and all AT RISK or should I say AT POTENTIAL. These labels include (Kids on probation, intensive probation, house arrest, alternatively assigned, expelled, pregnant, teenage parents, homeless and students being tried as adults in the correctional facilities).

These children have many things in common. Most with the weight of the world on their shoulders, lacking the necessary skills to be successful or the foundation to begin to restore their poor decisions and redirect their lives on the right path.

I have the distinct honor and privilege to help these students find the keys to unlock their greatest potential. Strategies and support systems that will benefit any organization that deals with difficult, defiant and low academic functioning adolescents.

The topic to assist administrators in creating a healthy, caring, safe and intellectually empowering educational environment.

My educational background includes Bachelor’s Degree in Varying Exceptionalities, Master’s in TESOL, Specialist in Educational Leadership and Doctorate in Organizational Management. I have over 17 year’s experience in education and a proven track record of success.

I am Dr. Erica Pooler, I was a product of every statistic that deemed I would fail. Born to a mother addicted to drugs and men that were no good for her and a father that spent most of my childhood life in prison. As a young girl I was abused and neglected, separated from my siblings, placed in foster home and eventually was taken in by my great grandmother. I basically raised myself. My great grandmother died when I was 15 years old. As a teen, I got into fights, was suspended, had judicial trouble and became pregnant at 17 years old. I went to eight schools before graduating from an alternative high school where as normal kids only went to three. One day my 11th grade teacher made a huge impact in my life. She helped me to find the keys to unlock my hidden potential and talent. I have been unstoppable and passionate about doing the same for other lost children who have yet to discover who they can truly be. I am empowered to help students learn to balance their cards of life. I teach them to not use their cards (life circumstances) as an excuse to fail but a reason to succeed.

Dr. Barbara Kirby-Bentley is a native of Sanford, Florida. She is married, with one son and two grandchildren. Dr. Kirby-Bentley has been an educator in Seminole County Public Schools for the past 45+ years. During her tenure, she spent 13 years in the classroom, 32 years in administration, with 29 of those as a principal. Dr. Kirby-Bentley was a principal in three uniquely different environments, serving students from K-12th grades. Also, during these administrative years, Dr. Kirby-Bentley was an adjunct instructor for Seminole Community College for 16 years and a visiting instructor for Rollins College of Winter Park, Florida. After leaving administration, Dr. Kirby-Bentley has worked as a General Education Diploma (GED) Instructor for the past three years. Her program has graduated 56 incarcerated or adjudicated youth in the past two years.

Discipline and parent involvement has always been Dr. Kirby-Bentley’s strength areas. She is a magnet for drawing people to engaging opportunities. She is focused and determined to make a difference in the life of young people. She is trust worthy and genuine in her approach to education.

Dr. Kirby-Bentley has been a guest panelist for the National Secretary of Education, speaking on behalf of Exceptional Education and Alternative Education students. She was the Vice President and President of the Florida Association of Alternative Educators and served on the State of Florida Board for seven years. She was the first African American to hold an office in the Seminole Education Association as Vice President. She was the first African American female to be named Principal of a Secondary School in Seminole County. She has received numerous awards and recognitions from various organizations in the State of Florida during her experience.

Keyword Descriptors

At risk, at potential, culture, mission, vision, cards of life, achievement gap, relationships, title 1, trust

Presentation Year

2015

Start Date

3-3-2015 4:00 PM

End Date

3-3-2015 5:30 PM

 
Mar 3rd, 4:00 PM Mar 3rd, 5:30 PM

When All Hope is Gone, Trust Then Believe: “At Risk” or “At Potential"?

Harborside Center East and West

The Cards of Life, when all hope is gone; trust then believe forces educators to view students differently. The notion that we can’t teach students until we truly begin to know them and they begin to trust us is challenged. The fact that our actions have to align with our words and meaningful conversations and relationships must be established in the classroom. At Risk or At Potential? Every school across the nation have students that struggle, academically, socially or behaviorally. There are a variety of reasons as to why? We can no longer ignore these students and pad the numbers to reflect a great school if all students are not being successful. As administrators, teachers, staff and community support members become involved, it has been clear that the child labeled AT RISK could be viewed as a child AT POTENTIAL.

If we looked at these students with a positive tag rather than a negative one, it is highly likely that we would have a different outlook and expectations for their futures.