Title

Implementation of Multi Material and Geometries on the Frontal Crumpling Zone of Electric Vehicles to Improve Crashworthiness

Location

Presentation- Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis Presentation (Restricted to Georgia Southern)

Faculty Mentor

Ermias Koricho

Faculty Mentor Email

ekoricho@georgiasouthern.edu

Presentation Year

2021

Start Date

26-4-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

30-4-2021 12:00 AM

Keywords

vehivles, bumper materials, materials science, collision energy

Description

Most vehicle bumper systems are traditionally made of materials such as steel or aluminum. While these materials are suitable for absorbing impacts, they carry significant weight. Advancements in materials science have made alternatives such as composites more accessible and practical, and these materials can be implemented into the bumper subsystem of an electric vehicle to reduce vehicle weight while maintaining or improving the crashworthiness of the vehicle. Furthermore, electric vehicles do not possess an internal combustion engine, which helps to manage the energy absorbed during a collision. This means the geometry of the crash structure plays a vital role in occupant safety and effectively absorbing collision energy in a controlled manner. This research focuses on the numerical modelling of these collisions using finite element software to determine the effectiveness of lightweight honeycomb geometry. The end goal is to maximize deformation energy while minimizing peak forces and acceleration on occupants as well as optimizing the weight of the structure.

Academic Unit

Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 12:00 AM Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

Implementation of Multi Material and Geometries on the Frontal Crumpling Zone of Electric Vehicles to Improve Crashworthiness

Presentation- Allen E. Paulson College of Engineering and Computing

Most vehicle bumper systems are traditionally made of materials such as steel or aluminum. While these materials are suitable for absorbing impacts, they carry significant weight. Advancements in materials science have made alternatives such as composites more accessible and practical, and these materials can be implemented into the bumper subsystem of an electric vehicle to reduce vehicle weight while maintaining or improving the crashworthiness of the vehicle. Furthermore, electric vehicles do not possess an internal combustion engine, which helps to manage the energy absorbed during a collision. This means the geometry of the crash structure plays a vital role in occupant safety and effectively absorbing collision energy in a controlled manner. This research focuses on the numerical modelling of these collisions using finite element software to determine the effectiveness of lightweight honeycomb geometry. The end goal is to maximize deformation energy while minimizing peak forces and acceleration on occupants as well as optimizing the weight of the structure.