Honors College Theses

Date

2022

Major

Health Sciences (B.S.)

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis (open access)

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Gregg Rich

Abstract

The aim of this study was to understand how hierarchical leisure constraints prohibited sport participation and influenced sport preferences during individuals’ adolescent years, and how these constraint effects may change during their early twenties. A sequential quantitative-qualitative mixed methods design was employed to (1) identify general changes in constraint effects on participation (i.e., quantitative) and then (2) better understand how sport preferences may be impacted by these constraint effects on participation (i.e., qualitative). A sample (n=70) of female (n= 26) and male (n=44) Georgia residents between the ages of 20-25 representing various ethnicities, backgrounds, and income levels participated in the study. Eight of the participants were interviewed following their completion of the online questionnaire. Online questionnaire data capturing past and present sport participation constraints were analyzed using two-tailed dependent sample t-tests, while the eight semi-structured interviews were analyzed through a constant comparative thematic analysis. Results indicated that perceived interpersonal constraint effects strengthened among individuals from adolescence into early adulthood. Structural constraints pertaining to timing and scheduling of sports, and the accessibility to sports were also perceived by individuals to be slightly more A few different to negotiate as young adults. Following qualitative analysis of semi-structure interviews, multiple themes were identified that related to hierarchical leisure constraints and perceived behavior control. To better validate and improve the generalizability of findings, future research should conduct similar studies with focus towards a specific sport, or consider various socioeconomic and demographic factors.

Thesis Summary

Findings suggest that most individuals preferred sports that are similar or the same as the sports in which they were socialized as adolescents. Additionally, changes in sociodemographic factors including income, social class, and areas stayed affected both sports participation and preference. Results indicated that perceived interpersonal constraint effects strengthened among individuals from adolescence into early adulthood. Structural constraints pertaining to timing and scheduling of sports, and the accessibility to sports were also perceived by individuals to be slightly more different to negotiate as young adults.

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