Proposal Title

Can Exercise Make You Smarter: A Relationship between Physical Activity and GPA

Primary Faculty Mentor’s Name

Dr. Helen Bland

Proposal Track

Student

Session Format

Poster

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physical activity influenced grade point average. The researcher hypothesized that individuals who exercised more frequently will have higher grade point averages (GPA). Both male and female college students reported that the main reason for exercising is to improve physical appearance (Bridges et al., 2005). Although it is known that physical activity has major health benefits, many barriers to exercising affect college students such as, school workload, lack of sleep and motivation (Bray et al., 2004). The research design used was a quantitative, descriptive, non-experimental, one-shot study in which participants were given a 17-question survey measuring physical activity (n=102). The sampling methodology conducted in this research was a non-probability, sample of convenience. Descriptive and inferential statistics reported means and a significant difference. Data analysis indicated that 48.0% of the participants were not physically active in the morning during the last 7 days, while 32.4% of the participants were physically active 2 or 3 times after lunch and before supper. Higher GPA was not linked significantly to physical activity (p>0.10) yet, when students were asked how they were performing academically, those who rated themselves as “above average” were significantly more likely to engage in physical activity (p

Keywords

Physical activity, Academic performance, College students

Location

Concourse/Atrium

Presentation Year

2014

Start Date

11-15-2014 9:40 AM

End Date

11-15-2014 10:55 AM

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Nov 15th, 9:40 AM Nov 15th, 10:55 AM

Can Exercise Make You Smarter: A Relationship between Physical Activity and GPA

Concourse/Atrium

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physical activity influenced grade point average. The researcher hypothesized that individuals who exercised more frequently will have higher grade point averages (GPA). Both male and female college students reported that the main reason for exercising is to improve physical appearance (Bridges et al., 2005). Although it is known that physical activity has major health benefits, many barriers to exercising affect college students such as, school workload, lack of sleep and motivation (Bray et al., 2004). The research design used was a quantitative, descriptive, non-experimental, one-shot study in which participants were given a 17-question survey measuring physical activity (n=102). The sampling methodology conducted in this research was a non-probability, sample of convenience. Descriptive and inferential statistics reported means and a significant difference. Data analysis indicated that 48.0% of the participants were not physically active in the morning during the last 7 days, while 32.4% of the participants were physically active 2 or 3 times after lunch and before supper. Higher GPA was not linked significantly to physical activity (p>0.10) yet, when students were asked how they were performing academically, those who rated themselves as “above average” were significantly more likely to engage in physical activity (p