Proposal Title

DC Voltage Created Perpendicularly to Nanostructured Metal Films by Surface Plasmon Polariton Excitation at Visible Frequencies.

Primary Faculty Mentor’s Name

Dr. Maxim Durach

Proposal Track

Student

Session Format

Paper Presentation

Abstract

Plasmonics is a scientific field, encompassing a plethora of novel phenomena related to electron-photon coupling in metal nanostructures and formation of hybrid electromagnetic waves propagating along various metal surfaces, collectively called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). SPPs can be excited in a broad band of frequencies from infrared to UV, including visible. SPPs feature extremely strong localized electric fields at selected locations on the boundaries of metal nanostructures, the so-called plasmonic hot spots. These fundamental properties of SPPs currently attract a lot of attention from optoelectronics community. SPPs have a broad range of applications starting from currently mass-produced SPP resonance biosensors for personalized healthcare to the ultrafast circuits for the computers of the future, involving plasmonic components with anticipated bandwidth of several hundred THz. It has been recently proposed and theoretically demonstrated by Durach and collaborators, that propagating optical SPPs create direct current (DC) in metal nanostructures which could have an immense impact on current nanotechnology.

We will describe the new results obtained by Matthew LePain working with Dr. Durach, demonstrating that SPPs in a nanostructured metal film create a rectified DC voltage signal perpendicular to the film, which maps the geometrical profile of the film. We obtained the solutions of Maxwell's equations for a metal film nanostructured by a planar grating, through matching a large number of diffraction waves to a large number of guided waves inside the grating structure, to achieve satisfactory approximation of the exact fields involving infinite expansions. Using the obtained electromagnetic fields of SPPs we calculate the rectified forces exerted upon electrons in the metal at particularly intriguing wavelengths. Using a hydrostatic approximation which we developed for the electrons in the nanostructure we are able to obtain voltages applied perpendicular to the film at normal incidence of external radiation. This work represents an important step toward future integration of plasmonics, electronics and optics.

Keywords

Nanotechnology, Nanoelectronics, Nanoptics, Plasmons, Plasmonics, Electromagnetic waves

Location

Room 2908

Presentation Year

2014

Start Date

11-15-2014 8:30 AM

End Date

11-15-2014 9:30 AM

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Nov 15th, 8:30 AM Nov 15th, 9:30 AM

DC Voltage Created Perpendicularly to Nanostructured Metal Films by Surface Plasmon Polariton Excitation at Visible Frequencies.

Room 2908

Plasmonics is a scientific field, encompassing a plethora of novel phenomena related to electron-photon coupling in metal nanostructures and formation of hybrid electromagnetic waves propagating along various metal surfaces, collectively called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). SPPs can be excited in a broad band of frequencies from infrared to UV, including visible. SPPs feature extremely strong localized electric fields at selected locations on the boundaries of metal nanostructures, the so-called plasmonic hot spots. These fundamental properties of SPPs currently attract a lot of attention from optoelectronics community. SPPs have a broad range of applications starting from currently mass-produced SPP resonance biosensors for personalized healthcare to the ultrafast circuits for the computers of the future, involving plasmonic components with anticipated bandwidth of several hundred THz. It has been recently proposed and theoretically demonstrated by Durach and collaborators, that propagating optical SPPs create direct current (DC) in metal nanostructures which could have an immense impact on current nanotechnology.

We will describe the new results obtained by Matthew LePain working with Dr. Durach, demonstrating that SPPs in a nanostructured metal film create a rectified DC voltage signal perpendicular to the film, which maps the geometrical profile of the film. We obtained the solutions of Maxwell's equations for a metal film nanostructured by a planar grating, through matching a large number of diffraction waves to a large number of guided waves inside the grating structure, to achieve satisfactory approximation of the exact fields involving infinite expansions. Using the obtained electromagnetic fields of SPPs we calculate the rectified forces exerted upon electrons in the metal at particularly intriguing wavelengths. Using a hydrostatic approximation which we developed for the electrons in the nanostructure we are able to obtain voltages applied perpendicular to the film at normal incidence of external radiation. This work represents an important step toward future integration of plasmonics, electronics and optics.