Location

PARB 255

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Much of the literature on academic integrity focuses on misconduct; there is little discussion of what constitutes ethical academic practice (Macfarlane, Zhang, Pun (2014); Blum (2009); East and Donnelly (2012)). I argue for teaching ethical use of sources in terms of three social values that are expressed in context-specific aways: fairness, helpfulness, and decorum. I interrogate a number of examples to show how each of these values is necessary to make sense out of academic citation practice. Though we know concepts of originality, textual ownership, and citation are complex and differ across contexts, media, and cultures, plagiarism is still widely treated as a black-and-white moral matter which can be sufficiently explained by warnings, threats, and fear of severe consequences (Valentine (2006); Howard (2000)). I propose that thinking of (and teaching) ethical use of sources in terms of these three values helps to distinguish between the more serious moral issues and the less serious cultural literacy issues.

Presentation Description

Argues for teaching ethical use of sources in terms of three social values that are expressed in context-specific aways: fairness, helpfulness, and decorum. Interrogates a number of examples to show how each of these values is necessary to make sense out of academic citation practice.

Session Goals

To advocate for a new way of thinking about and teaching ethical use of sources across contexts, but, particularly in academic writing.

Session Objectives

1. Show that teaching on ethical use of sources tends to be remedial, ad hoc, and focused on avoiding punishment, despite the well-known pedagogical limitations of such approaches.

2. Argue for teaching ethical use of sources in terms of three social values that are expressed in context-specific aways: fairness, helpfulness, and decorum.

3. Examine how fairness, helpfulness, and decorum play out in different contexts, genres, and media by examining a variety of sample cases.

Keywords

Ethical use of sources, academic integrity, citation practice, plagiarism

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 21st, 3:15 PM Feb 21st, 4:30 PM

Citations as Expressions of Fairness, Helpfulness, and Decorum

PARB 255

Much of the literature on academic integrity focuses on misconduct; there is little discussion of what constitutes ethical academic practice (Macfarlane, Zhang, Pun (2014); Blum (2009); East and Donnelly (2012)). I argue for teaching ethical use of sources in terms of three social values that are expressed in context-specific aways: fairness, helpfulness, and decorum. I interrogate a number of examples to show how each of these values is necessary to make sense out of academic citation practice. Though we know concepts of originality, textual ownership, and citation are complex and differ across contexts, media, and cultures, plagiarism is still widely treated as a black-and-white moral matter which can be sufficiently explained by warnings, threats, and fear of severe consequences (Valentine (2006); Howard (2000)). I propose that thinking of (and teaching) ethical use of sources in terms of these three values helps to distinguish between the more serious moral issues and the less serious cultural literacy issues.