Presentation Title

Double Shots, Not Decaf! Going beyond the one-shot as an embedded librarian

Location

Room 211

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

The typical one-shot method of library instruction challenges a librarian to teach students everything they need to know in one session, before the students doze off in the first few minutes. An alternative has a librarian in an online environment providing assistance though chat or discussion boards. These embedded librarians are also challenged because it requires the student to make the connection, and they often snooze through that opportunity too. This caffeinated presentation offers a different solution to the age-old librarian problem: “How do I get students to interact with me and learn a little in the process?”

For the last three years, a Georgia Highlands College librarian and English professor have partnered to create a graded discussion board assignment. The students must interact with the librarian as they move through the steps of developing keywords, conducting searches, and evaluating sources. Once the assignment is completed, the librarian grades their work. Because students receive multiple interactions with the librarian, they get individualized attention and retain more skills they need for future research. They also understand the librarian has a stake in their grade, so they perk up and engage in the content.

In order to evaluate this initiative, together we created rubrics to review sources on the final essay and to assess interaction on the discussion board. We believe students who engaged in the discussion board will have a better score on their “Works Cited” pages. So grab a cup of coffee and join me as I share our “double shot” strategy!

Presentation Description

Double shots are better than a one-shot! A GHC librarian and English professor have partnered in an ongoing information literacy project involving online English classes, graded discussion boards, and multiple librarian interactions. We believe students who take advantage of this “double-shot” library instruction assignment do better on their research, so grab a cup to go and join me as I share our strategy!

Session Goals

Explore alternatives to traditional "one-shot" librarian instruction models.

Session Objectives

Brief overview of traditional instruction ("one shot")

Alternative instruction models ("Double shot")

Summary of initial assessment data from recent semesters

Keywords

Library Instruction; Embedded librarians; Information literacy; Library assignments; English composition courses; Faculty and librarian partnerships; Online education; D2L

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 28th, 1:00 PM Sep 28th, 1:20 PM

Double Shots, Not Decaf! Going beyond the one-shot as an embedded librarian

Room 211

The typical one-shot method of library instruction challenges a librarian to teach students everything they need to know in one session, before the students doze off in the first few minutes. An alternative has a librarian in an online environment providing assistance though chat or discussion boards. These embedded librarians are also challenged because it requires the student to make the connection, and they often snooze through that opportunity too. This caffeinated presentation offers a different solution to the age-old librarian problem: “How do I get students to interact with me and learn a little in the process?”

For the last three years, a Georgia Highlands College librarian and English professor have partnered to create a graded discussion board assignment. The students must interact with the librarian as they move through the steps of developing keywords, conducting searches, and evaluating sources. Once the assignment is completed, the librarian grades their work. Because students receive multiple interactions with the librarian, they get individualized attention and retain more skills they need for future research. They also understand the librarian has a stake in their grade, so they perk up and engage in the content.

In order to evaluate this initiative, together we created rubrics to review sources on the final essay and to assess interaction on the discussion board. We believe students who engaged in the discussion board will have a better score on their “Works Cited” pages. So grab a cup of coffee and join me as I share our “double shot” strategy!