Presentation Title

The Development of Citation Use in Scientific Writing

Location

Room 217

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) has published a framework for information literacy in higher education, which includes the ethical use of resources. In scientific writing, students encounter difficulty at all levels of information literacy, but particularly with understanding how resources should be used. For example, many students are unable to distinguish primary research from secondary scientific literature. In addition, it is common for students to improperly cite, paraphrase, and use primary and secondary articles, demonstrating a deficiency in their ethical use. Many of these challenges stem from a lack of experience with these articles and instruction. While the ACRL framework applies to all disciplines, the application could be discipline-specific. Informally, students often state that they rely on their instruction in the humanities to drive their literacy practices in the sciences. This could present a challenge when the citation styles and conventions change, but it could also present an opportunity for deeper learning. At this time, we need more detail on how students interact with their texts in higher education in different contexts. This presentation will describe ongoing research to understand the ethical use of resources in scientific writing from students across multiple scientific courses at one institution. It also investigates student’s experiences using scientific literature through surveys and writing assessments. Together, this project aims to quantitatively and qualitatively define citations in scientific writing to better inform pedagogy and improve information literacy in the sciences.

Presentation Description

This presentation will describe ongoing research to understand the ethical use of resources in scientific writing from students across multiple scientific courses at one institution. It also investigates student’s experiences using scientific literature through surveys and writing assessments. Together, this project aims to quantitatively and qualitatively define citations in scientific writing to better inform pedagogy and improve information literacy in the sciences.

Keywords

Scientific Writing, Citation Practices, Science literacy, Information literacy, Ethical use of resources, primary research articles, review articles

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Sep 15th, 8:30 AM Sep 15th, 9:45 AM

The Development of Citation Use in Scientific Writing

Room 217

The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) has published a framework for information literacy in higher education, which includes the ethical use of resources. In scientific writing, students encounter difficulty at all levels of information literacy, but particularly with understanding how resources should be used. For example, many students are unable to distinguish primary research from secondary scientific literature. In addition, it is common for students to improperly cite, paraphrase, and use primary and secondary articles, demonstrating a deficiency in their ethical use. Many of these challenges stem from a lack of experience with these articles and instruction. While the ACRL framework applies to all disciplines, the application could be discipline-specific. Informally, students often state that they rely on their instruction in the humanities to drive their literacy practices in the sciences. This could present a challenge when the citation styles and conventions change, but it could also present an opportunity for deeper learning. At this time, we need more detail on how students interact with their texts in higher education in different contexts. This presentation will describe ongoing research to understand the ethical use of resources in scientific writing from students across multiple scientific courses at one institution. It also investigates student’s experiences using scientific literature through surveys and writing assessments. Together, this project aims to quantitatively and qualitatively define citations in scientific writing to better inform pedagogy and improve information literacy in the sciences.