Presentation Title

Making sense of Citations

Location

Room 217

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Other

Primarily higher education, but I know that secondary education librarians could benefit as well

Abstract

How many times do we hear some variation on, "Why do we have to do citations?" At Saint Martin's University, we have noticed that many faculty, as well-meaning as they are, quickly rush through the mechanics of citation without addressing the "why" of the process. We have developed a workshop to address this gap in students' understanding of the concept. At the core of this workshop we present the concept of scholarly conversations and boil citations down to answering five basic questions: 1) Who made it? 2) What is it? 3) Where can I find it? 4) When was it made? 5) If it's electronic, what is the link? By setting up citations as answers to these implicit questions, students have expressed they better understand the structure and function of citations, which they say will help them in the future.

Presentation Description

This presentation introduces a conceptual approach to citations that gives students a structure through which they can clearly see the function and structure of citations.

Keywords

APA citations, MLA citations, Conceptual approach, workshop

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Sep 15th, 8:30 AM Sep 15th, 9:45 AM

Making sense of Citations

Room 217

How many times do we hear some variation on, "Why do we have to do citations?" At Saint Martin's University, we have noticed that many faculty, as well-meaning as they are, quickly rush through the mechanics of citation without addressing the "why" of the process. We have developed a workshop to address this gap in students' understanding of the concept. At the core of this workshop we present the concept of scholarly conversations and boil citations down to answering five basic questions: 1) Who made it? 2) What is it? 3) Where can I find it? 4) When was it made? 5) If it's electronic, what is the link? By setting up citations as answers to these implicit questions, students have expressed they better understand the structure and function of citations, which they say will help them in the future.