Presentation Title

Assigning Vs. Teaching: Utilizing Research and Composition Skills Across Disciplines

Location

Room 212

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Too often, composition students fail to understand the importance of efficient research skills outside of and beyond their first-year composition courses. This phenomenon could be the result of “the emphasis on finding and evaluating information at the heart of the work [overshadowing] the literacy aspect for some writing instructors,” according to Howard and Jamieson. In order for students to carry their research skills with them throughout their college experience, they must be taught these skills in a more applicable way; therefore, composition instructors must adopt the idea of teaching the literature review so that students learn how to not only locate and evaluate sources, but also synthesize and employ sources for future issues – to develop true information literacy. Focusing on information literacy is the key to composition courses being beneficial and relevant for all students entering into a variety of fields. Furthermore, information literacy's place within these courses is what sets them apart from other English courses and allows them to be useful for students pursuing degrees outside of the liberal arts. This presentation will outline how composition students’ understanding and practice of a social sciences literature review can double as an effective means of developing information for future projects across disciplines.

Presentation Description

This presentation will outline how composition instructors can teach the literature review so that their students' research skills can be applied to future projects outside of and beyond the first-year composition course. Participants will learn how teaching rather than merely assigning research projects allows students to develop and understand the value of information literacy as it applies to them in their individual fields.

Keywords

composition, writing, first-year composition, researched writing, rhetoric and composition, rhetoric

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Sep 16th, 10:45 AM Sep 16th, 12:00 PM

Assigning Vs. Teaching: Utilizing Research and Composition Skills Across Disciplines

Room 212

Too often, composition students fail to understand the importance of efficient research skills outside of and beyond their first-year composition courses. This phenomenon could be the result of “the emphasis on finding and evaluating information at the heart of the work [overshadowing] the literacy aspect for some writing instructors,” according to Howard and Jamieson. In order for students to carry their research skills with them throughout their college experience, they must be taught these skills in a more applicable way; therefore, composition instructors must adopt the idea of teaching the literature review so that students learn how to not only locate and evaluate sources, but also synthesize and employ sources for future issues – to develop true information literacy. Focusing on information literacy is the key to composition courses being beneficial and relevant for all students entering into a variety of fields. Furthermore, information literacy's place within these courses is what sets them apart from other English courses and allows them to be useful for students pursuing degrees outside of the liberal arts. This presentation will outline how composition students’ understanding and practice of a social sciences literature review can double as an effective means of developing information for future projects across disciplines.