Presentation Title

Teaching Students to Enjoy the Research Process

Location

Room 2005

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Wouldn’t every professor love to hear students at the end of the semester say: “I wish we could have written a research paper in this class!” This presentation describes a collaborative effort between the art history program and the library’s art subject liaison at California University of Pennsylvania that develops an enthusiasm for and enjoyment of the research process itself that results in just such a reaction. Our collaboration arose out of a desire to target appropriate research outcomes at various points in the lower- and upper-level art history courses. It also came out of a desire to ensure that students reach various research benchmarks over the course of their careers at the university. In order to do this, we scaffolded the art history curriculum and mapped it to information literacy outcomes. Our collaborative project includes assignments that allow students to explore topics that are of interest to them, which helps build enthusiasm for the research process. In addition, by scaffolding the curriculum we have allowed students the opportunity to focus on different aspects of the research process. For example, in one mid-level assignment, students are guided through a step-by-step, semester-long process in which they generate and refine a research question. The process includes finding and reading scholarly articles in order to construct an annotated bibliography. Our goal is to cultivate student-scholars who understand (and enjoy) scholarly research as well as their own roles within the sphere of scholarly activity.

Presentation Description

This collaboration effort between the art history program and the library’s art subject liaison at California University of Pennsylvania to scaffold the art history curriculum and map it to various information literacy outcomes cultivates student-scholars who understand (and enjoy) scholarly research. Students build enthusiasm for the research process through step-by-step, semester-long assignment. They are guided to find and critically evaluate information and to continually refine their research question, which allows them to deeply explore topics of interest to them.

Session Goals

n/a

Session Objectives

n/a

Keywords

"Art History" "Curriculum Mapping" "Research Process"

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 16th, 12:15 PM Sep 16th, 1:30 PM

Teaching Students to Enjoy the Research Process

Room 2005

Wouldn’t every professor love to hear students at the end of the semester say: “I wish we could have written a research paper in this class!” This presentation describes a collaborative effort between the art history program and the library’s art subject liaison at California University of Pennsylvania that develops an enthusiasm for and enjoyment of the research process itself that results in just such a reaction. Our collaboration arose out of a desire to target appropriate research outcomes at various points in the lower- and upper-level art history courses. It also came out of a desire to ensure that students reach various research benchmarks over the course of their careers at the university. In order to do this, we scaffolded the art history curriculum and mapped it to information literacy outcomes. Our collaborative project includes assignments that allow students to explore topics that are of interest to them, which helps build enthusiasm for the research process. In addition, by scaffolding the curriculum we have allowed students the opportunity to focus on different aspects of the research process. For example, in one mid-level assignment, students are guided through a step-by-step, semester-long process in which they generate and refine a research question. The process includes finding and reading scholarly articles in order to construct an annotated bibliography. Our goal is to cultivate student-scholars who understand (and enjoy) scholarly research as well as their own roles within the sphere of scholarly activity.