Presentation Title

Beyond Information: New Literacies for Instruction Librarians

Location

Room 2005

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

While information literacy remains a useful phrase to define and communicate the work of instruction librarians, the evolving complexity of information sources and ecosystems demands new skills and vocabularies. The proliferating number of terms in the professional literature attests to this fact; web literacy, media literacy, primary-source literacy, critical information literacy, digital literacy, critical digital literacy, and metaliteracy are only some of the alternatives that have emerged. Recent headlines about “fake news” have also lent new urgency to critical source evaluation. Advocating for “critical digital literacy” in a December 2016 piece for Hybrid Pedagogy (“Truthy Lies and Surreal Truths” A Please for Critical Digital Literacies”), Kris Shaffer argues that this set of competencies is “more than traditional information literacy.” He calls for educators and their students to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which information is produced, consumed, and disseminated online—especially with respect to the “technological, sociological, and psychological implications of connective digital media.”

This presentation will chart the emerging constellation of terms related to information literacy and explore ways in which librarians might revise their own language and learning objectives in response. We will also identify skills and partnerships necessary to implement these curricular changes. Lastly, we will examine the relationship between these emerging literacies and libraries’ current assessment practices, especially those developed in dialogue with ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and concomitant information literacy “in the disciplines” documents.

Presentation Description

This presentation will explore the increasing number of terms used in higher education to describe competencies related to information literacy and ask how these emerging concepts might affect instruction librarians’ training, teaching, and assessment practices. The discussion will also examine the role of faculty and staff partnerships in teaching these new and evolving literacies.

Keywords

Library instruction, Teaching partnerships, Digital literacy, Critical information literacy, Assessment

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Sep 16th, 10:45 AM Sep 16th, 12:00 PM

Beyond Information: New Literacies for Instruction Librarians

Room 2005

While information literacy remains a useful phrase to define and communicate the work of instruction librarians, the evolving complexity of information sources and ecosystems demands new skills and vocabularies. The proliferating number of terms in the professional literature attests to this fact; web literacy, media literacy, primary-source literacy, critical information literacy, digital literacy, critical digital literacy, and metaliteracy are only some of the alternatives that have emerged. Recent headlines about “fake news” have also lent new urgency to critical source evaluation. Advocating for “critical digital literacy” in a December 2016 piece for Hybrid Pedagogy (“Truthy Lies and Surreal Truths” A Please for Critical Digital Literacies”), Kris Shaffer argues that this set of competencies is “more than traditional information literacy.” He calls for educators and their students to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the ways in which information is produced, consumed, and disseminated online—especially with respect to the “technological, sociological, and psychological implications of connective digital media.”

This presentation will chart the emerging constellation of terms related to information literacy and explore ways in which librarians might revise their own language and learning objectives in response. We will also identify skills and partnerships necessary to implement these curricular changes. Lastly, we will examine the relationship between these emerging literacies and libraries’ current assessment practices, especially those developed in dialogue with ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and concomitant information literacy “in the disciplines” documents.