Presentation Title

Avoiding Overload: Cognitive Load and Instructional Design for Information Literacy Instruction

Location

Room 2005

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Librarians know that research is complex and that students often need help navigating their research process, as well as the library’s many resources. We teach information literacy skills and concepts to help students with their research needs, however, we often run the risk of providing too much information, which can lead to cognitive overload and have negative effects on learning. Due to the limited time frame and format of one-shot instruction sessions, it is important for us to consider how to present information in ways that are most conducive to learning and retention.

This presentation will give an overview of cognitive load theory, and discuss how an understanding of cognitive load can support the design of library instruction. Learning is impacted not only by the amount of information presented, but also by learners’ prior knowledge, the design of instructional materials and activities, and the complexity of information being learned. The presenter will include findings from cognitive load theory research, and make connections that apply cognitive load theory to the design of academic library instruction, while considering the limitations of one-shot sessions.

Attendees will leave this presentation with a basic understanding of cognitive load theory, and ideas for enhancing instructional strategies and student learning based on human cognition.

Presentation Description

In our efforts to teach students the many information literacy skills and concepts needed for their research, librarians run the risk of providing too much information during instruction, which can lead to cognitive overload and have negative affects on learning. This presentation will give an overview of cognitive load theory and discuss how it can be applied to instructional design for more effective teaching and learning.

Session Goals

n/a

Session Objectives

n/a

Keywords

instructional design, cognitive load theory, instruction, information literacy, pedagogy

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Sep 16th, 10:45 AM Sep 16th, 12:00 PM

Avoiding Overload: Cognitive Load and Instructional Design for Information Literacy Instruction

Room 2005

Librarians know that research is complex and that students often need help navigating their research process, as well as the library’s many resources. We teach information literacy skills and concepts to help students with their research needs, however, we often run the risk of providing too much information, which can lead to cognitive overload and have negative effects on learning. Due to the limited time frame and format of one-shot instruction sessions, it is important for us to consider how to present information in ways that are most conducive to learning and retention.

This presentation will give an overview of cognitive load theory, and discuss how an understanding of cognitive load can support the design of library instruction. Learning is impacted not only by the amount of information presented, but also by learners’ prior knowledge, the design of instructional materials and activities, and the complexity of information being learned. The presenter will include findings from cognitive load theory research, and make connections that apply cognitive load theory to the design of academic library instruction, while considering the limitations of one-shot sessions.

Attendees will leave this presentation with a basic understanding of cognitive load theory, and ideas for enhancing instructional strategies and student learning based on human cognition.