Presentation Title

Look Here! Engaging the Senses and the ACRL Framework with Library Displays

Location

Room 1005

Type of Presentation

Workshop (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Library Displays have long been a staple product of the library environment. Often, they are created to highlight holidays, month-long observances (Black History, National Poetry Month), or new acquisitions. However, with thought and a little extra planning, a library display can target special population pockets and provide the gateway to conversation and understanding. Further, innovations in content management technology allow librarians to convey displays to larger audiences and use them in a variety of platforms for instruction, curriculum building, and outreach. Methods such as private and open exhibit sessions allow the user to have a once-in-a-lifetime experience of handling objects that might be showcased in displays, and digital additions allow engagement and learning in multiple contexts.

The session will begin with a brief survey (10 minutes) to start the conversation. Presenters will then provide a 40-minute overview of specific examples of displays, knowledge practices attached, methods of assessment, ideas for expanding reach, and how the initiatives engage the ACRL Framework. Participants will then break into small groups for a 20-minute guided activity where they will develop a plan for a specific display. Targeted instruction will encourage thinking beyond normal display ideas, and will include possible assessment options to better incorporate framework practices. Five minutes will be reserved for discussion and questions.

Participants will leave this workshop with a plan for designing an engaging library display, and also a plan for assessment that extends the conversation beyond guest book signatures or patron counts.

Presentation Description

Library Displays have long been a staple product of the library environment. With thought and a little extra planning, a display can target special population pockets, providing the gateway to conversation and understanding. Innovations in content management technology allow librarians to reach larger audiences and digital additions allow engagement and learning in multiple contexts; providing platforms for instruction, curriculum building, and outreach. These displays also support the ACRL Framework by providing the foundation for scholarly conversation.

Keywords

Library Displays, Educational Displays, ACRL Framework, Knowledge Practices, Assessment, Outreach, Public Libraries, Academic Libraries, Special Libraries

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 15th, 10:00 AM Sep 15th, 11:30 AM

Look Here! Engaging the Senses and the ACRL Framework with Library Displays

Room 1005

Library Displays have long been a staple product of the library environment. Often, they are created to highlight holidays, month-long observances (Black History, National Poetry Month), or new acquisitions. However, with thought and a little extra planning, a library display can target special population pockets and provide the gateway to conversation and understanding. Further, innovations in content management technology allow librarians to convey displays to larger audiences and use them in a variety of platforms for instruction, curriculum building, and outreach. Methods such as private and open exhibit sessions allow the user to have a once-in-a-lifetime experience of handling objects that might be showcased in displays, and digital additions allow engagement and learning in multiple contexts.

The session will begin with a brief survey (10 minutes) to start the conversation. Presenters will then provide a 40-minute overview of specific examples of displays, knowledge practices attached, methods of assessment, ideas for expanding reach, and how the initiatives engage the ACRL Framework. Participants will then break into small groups for a 20-minute guided activity where they will develop a plan for a specific display. Targeted instruction will encourage thinking beyond normal display ideas, and will include possible assessment options to better incorporate framework practices. Five minutes will be reserved for discussion and questions.

Participants will leave this workshop with a plan for designing an engaging library display, and also a plan for assessment that extends the conversation beyond guest book signatures or patron counts.