Presentation Title

Using “Elaboration” to Improve Mastery of New Material

Location

Room 218/220

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

In their book, Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, the authors define elaboration as “the process of finding additional layers of meaning in new material.” As students read new material, they then apply that material to what they already know, making it much more likely that they will retain the information. By developing visual images of a topic and stating the problem in their own words, they can articulate concepts and present information in a more meaningful and relaxed manner. They may also feel empowered by contributing their own ideas to the conversation; thus, paraphrasing becomes a less difficult concept when they approach writing assignments.

The process of elaboration enables the student to develop concept maps, delve into keyword creation and relational thinking more easily, and speed up the research process. Students will enjoy creatively developing their topics, recognizing that there are no limits to what they can explore about a given subject. Through peer review activities, students are able to make and reinforce deep connections, recognizing their own expertise and assumptions as they participate in conversations with their classmates. This process aids students in defining complex or nebulous concepts, such as “value” and “good,” that are often used as descriptors in research and writing.

This session will address how relational thinking and concept mapping can improve research strategies and make the writing process less intimidating. The presenters will provide a variety of easily adaptable strategies for employing elaboration to facilitate research and make composition more natural.

Note:

**This panel could also be adapted to a workshop with activities for participants**

Presentation Description

Students can creatively engage in finding complex layers of meaning, a process known as elaboration, by concept mapping their thinking and understanding of a topic. Coupled with peer review, which allows students to recognize their own expertise and assumptions, elaboration helps students navigate challenging and nebulous concepts in research and writing. See how relational thinking and concept mapping can improve research strategies and make the writing process less intimidating. Leave with a variety of easily adaptable strategies for employing elaboration to facilitate research and making composition more natural.

Keywords

elaboration, concept mapping, keyword creation, paraphrasing, visual imaging, information retention, relational thinking, peer review, confidence building

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Sep 15th, 8:30 AM Sep 15th, 9:45 AM

Using “Elaboration” to Improve Mastery of New Material

Room 218/220

In their book, Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, the authors define elaboration as “the process of finding additional layers of meaning in new material.” As students read new material, they then apply that material to what they already know, making it much more likely that they will retain the information. By developing visual images of a topic and stating the problem in their own words, they can articulate concepts and present information in a more meaningful and relaxed manner. They may also feel empowered by contributing their own ideas to the conversation; thus, paraphrasing becomes a less difficult concept when they approach writing assignments.

The process of elaboration enables the student to develop concept maps, delve into keyword creation and relational thinking more easily, and speed up the research process. Students will enjoy creatively developing their topics, recognizing that there are no limits to what they can explore about a given subject. Through peer review activities, students are able to make and reinforce deep connections, recognizing their own expertise and assumptions as they participate in conversations with their classmates. This process aids students in defining complex or nebulous concepts, such as “value” and “good,” that are often used as descriptors in research and writing.

This session will address how relational thinking and concept mapping can improve research strategies and make the writing process less intimidating. The presenters will provide a variety of easily adaptable strategies for employing elaboration to facilitate research and make composition more natural.

Note:

**This panel could also be adapted to a workshop with activities for participants**