Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Language, Culture, Identity, and Power: Intercultural Learning/Teaching in China, Costa Rica, Mexico, and the United States

Titles of Presentations in a Panel

"Language, Culture, Identity, and Power: Intercultural Learning/Teaching"
(Shannon-Baker; Miller; He)

"The Multiplicity and Intersectionality of Arab-American Muslims’ Identity and Its Implications for Their Children’s Experience of Mainstream Schooling in the United States"
(Ahluwalia)

"Languages, Cultures, and Identities: Immersion Experiences of HBCU Students in a Study Abroad Program in Costa Rica"
(Tedrick)

"In the Midst but Nowhere: Cross-Cultural Narrative Inquiry into Experience of Chinese Ethnic Minorities Studying in Universities in Georgia, U.S."
(Li)

"Becoming a Mexican American in the U. S. South: An Autobiographical Narrative of Liberation"
(Martinez)

Abstract

In this curriculum dialogue session, a group of multiethnic researchers explore their experience of language, culture, identity, and power in intercultural learning and teaching in China, CostaRica, Mexico, and the United States. Such experience helps them to understand teaching contexts embodied in race, gender, class, language, culture, ethnicity, identity, sexual orientation, and ability, and the potential impact of these characteristics on students’ educational experiences, learning, and academic success. Such experience helps them to engage in culturally
relevant/responsive/sustaining teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation practices based on students’ developmental needs and their cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Such experience helps them to recognize implicit and explicit bias and purposefully overcome such bias to create inclusive and equitable educational opportunities for all students. Such experience enables them to validate the cultural capital of urban students as assets/funds of knowledge to inform their instructional practices and dispositions. Such experience encourages them to make a commitment to the empowerment of culturally and linguistically diverse students within formal and informal educational contexts. Such experience inspires them to develop culturally and linguistically relevant/responsive/sustaining curricular knowledge and pedagogical strategies,
and value funds of knowledge and community resources to envision curricular and pedagogical innovations as ways to cultivate culturally and linguistically inspirational learning environments and create equal opportunities to empower racially, culturally, socioeconomically, and
linguistically diverse students to reach their highest potential (Sidle-Walker, 1996). Potentials, challenges, and future directions of intercultural learning and teaching are also discussed.

Presentation Description

In this curriculum dialogue session, a group of multiethnic researchers explore their experience of language, culture, identity, and power in intercultural learning and teaching in China, CostaRica, Mexico, and the United States. Such experience helps them to understand teaching contexts embodied in race, gender, class, language, culture, ethnicity, identity, sexual orientation, and ability, and the potential impact of these characteristics on students’ educational experiences, learning, and academic success. Such experience helps them to engage in culturally relevant/responsive/sustaining teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation practices based on students’ developmental needs and their cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Such experience helps them to recognize implicit and explicit bias and purposefully overcome such bias to create inclusive and equitable educational opportunities for all students. Such experience enables them to validate the cultural capital of urban students as assets/funds of knowledge to inform their instructional practices and dispositions. Such experience encourages them to make a commitment to the empowerment of culturally and linguistically diverse students within formal and informal educational contexts. Such experience inspires them to develop culturally and linguistically relevant/responsive/sustaining curricular knowledge and pedagogical strategies, and value funds of knowledge and community resources to envision curricular and pedagogical innovations as ways to cultivate culturally and linguistically inspirational learning environments and create equal opportunities to empower racially, culturally, socioeconomically, and linguistically diverse students to reach their highest potential (Sidle-Walker, 1996). Potentials, challenges, and future directions of intercultural learning and teaching are also discussed.

Location

Stream B: Curriculum Dialogues

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 11th, 5:15 PM Jun 11th, 6:30 PM

Language, Culture, Identity, and Power: Intercultural Learning/Teaching in China, Costa Rica, Mexico, and the United States

Stream B: Curriculum Dialogues

In this curriculum dialogue session, a group of multiethnic researchers explore their experience of language, culture, identity, and power in intercultural learning and teaching in China, CostaRica, Mexico, and the United States. Such experience helps them to understand teaching contexts embodied in race, gender, class, language, culture, ethnicity, identity, sexual orientation, and ability, and the potential impact of these characteristics on students’ educational experiences, learning, and academic success. Such experience helps them to engage in culturally
relevant/responsive/sustaining teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation practices based on students’ developmental needs and their cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Such experience helps them to recognize implicit and explicit bias and purposefully overcome such bias to create inclusive and equitable educational opportunities for all students. Such experience enables them to validate the cultural capital of urban students as assets/funds of knowledge to inform their instructional practices and dispositions. Such experience encourages them to make a commitment to the empowerment of culturally and linguistically diverse students within formal and informal educational contexts. Such experience inspires them to develop culturally and linguistically relevant/responsive/sustaining curricular knowledge and pedagogical strategies,
and value funds of knowledge and community resources to envision curricular and pedagogical innovations as ways to cultivate culturally and linguistically inspirational learning environments and create equal opportunities to empower racially, culturally, socioeconomically, and
linguistically diverse students to reach their highest potential (Sidle-Walker, 1996). Potentials, challenges, and future directions of intercultural learning and teaching are also discussed.