Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Data, Date, Everywhere: What’s an Educator to Think?

Abstract

While using data in higher education has become an emerging trend (Drake & Walz, 2018), some studies question its effectiveness in improving teaching and learning, especially in early-term, high impact courses (Cox, et al., 2017). One method to improve effectiveness involves creating a faculty-driven data culture (Hora, Bouwma-Gearhart, & Joon Park, 2017).

This session focuses on how one Composition Department has established a culture where academic leadership, course leads, curriculum, and faculty work together to collect and analyze data through metrics, external evaluations, research pipeline projects, pilots, and other methods. The department uses the data to identify and address challenges through course revisions and standard practices for feedback, outreach, and course revisions. New data is then used to evaluate the effectiveness of changes.

The session examines how the development of this faculty-driven data culture has successfully improved student success, learning, and experience while giving faculty an increased sense of ownership over course content, instruction, and assessment. It shows a connection between improving these factors and persistence and retention. It explores methods of gathering and analyzing data for course revision and process enhancement. It discusses the specific roles academic leadership, curriculum, course leads, and faculty play in data gathering and analysis, implementing resulting course or process revisions, and assessing effectiveness of changes. Finally, it provides specific examples of data informed changes made in curriculum and processes as well as their outcomes in terms of student success, learning, and experience.

Presentation Description

While using data in higher education has become an emerging trend (Drake & Walz, 2018), some studies question its effectiveness in improving teaching and learning, especially in early-term, high impact courses (Cox, et al., 2017). One method to improve effectiveness involves creating a faculty-driven data culture (Hora, Bouwma-Gearhart, & Joon Park, 2017). This session focuses on how one Composition Department has established a culture where academic leadership, course leads, curriculum, and faculty work together to collect and analyze data through metrics, external evaluations, research pipeline projects, pilots, and other methods. The department uses the data to identify and address challenges through course revisions and standard practices for feedback, outreach, and course revisions. New data is then used to evaluate the effectiveness of changes. The session examines how the development of this faculty-driven data culture has successfully improved student success, learning, and experience while giving faculty an increased sense of ownership over course content, instruction, and assessment. It shows a connection between improving these factors and persistence and retention. It explores methods of gathering and analyzing data for course revision and process enhancement. It discusses the specific roles academic leadership, curriculum, course leads, and faculty play in data gathering and analysis, implementing resulting course or process revisions, and assessing effectiveness of changes. Finally, it provides specific examples of data informed changes made in curriculum and processes as well as their outcomes in terms of student success, learning, and experience.

Location

Stream B: Curriculum Dialogues

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jun 11th, 1:00 PM Jun 11th, 2:15 PM

Data, Date, Everywhere: What’s an Educator to Think?

Stream B: Curriculum Dialogues

While using data in higher education has become an emerging trend (Drake & Walz, 2018), some studies question its effectiveness in improving teaching and learning, especially in early-term, high impact courses (Cox, et al., 2017). One method to improve effectiveness involves creating a faculty-driven data culture (Hora, Bouwma-Gearhart, & Joon Park, 2017).

This session focuses on how one Composition Department has established a culture where academic leadership, course leads, curriculum, and faculty work together to collect and analyze data through metrics, external evaluations, research pipeline projects, pilots, and other methods. The department uses the data to identify and address challenges through course revisions and standard practices for feedback, outreach, and course revisions. New data is then used to evaluate the effectiveness of changes.

The session examines how the development of this faculty-driven data culture has successfully improved student success, learning, and experience while giving faculty an increased sense of ownership over course content, instruction, and assessment. It shows a connection between improving these factors and persistence and retention. It explores methods of gathering and analyzing data for course revision and process enhancement. It discusses the specific roles academic leadership, curriculum, course leads, and faculty play in data gathering and analysis, implementing resulting course or process revisions, and assessing effectiveness of changes. Finally, it provides specific examples of data informed changes made in curriculum and processes as well as their outcomes in terms of student success, learning, and experience.