Title

Gilmore Girls, Jane the Virgin, and Black-ish: Intersectionality and Mother-Daughter Relationships on Network Television

Biographical Sketch

Alexis Romero Walker is a student, teacher, and filmmaker. She received her Bachelors of Arts from Brigham Young University in Media Arts with a minor in Theatre Arts, and is currently attending Sacred Heart University to receive her Masters of Arts in Media Literacy. Alexis grew up in Southern California, but also considers Utah, London, Connecticut, and New York her homes as she is an avid long-term traveler.

Alexis primarily focuses on her interests in racial and gender issues, as well as media education and pedagogy. She also is primarily interested in the moving image and film theory in relation to minority representation and stereotypes.

Alexis is passionate about social justice and plans to demonstrate that through her research, teaching, and involvement in social movements. She is currently on the student leadership council for NAMLE to better promote Media Literacy Education, and to further that goal she is striving to obtain her PhD and become a Media Professor within higher education.

Type of Presentation

Individual presentation

Brief Description of Presentation

The presentation would consist of a around 20 minute visual presentation describing how the specific shows of Gilmore Girls, Jane the Virgin, and Black-ish represent mother-daughter relationships. This would be done in this order to address how this is presented in relation to whiteness versus people of color, as well as addressing how class falls into the category. This will be done with a powerpoint to display images and important information regarding the research that has been done.

Abstract of Proposal

This thesis focuses on how mother-daughter relationships are presented in television media. Through the textual analysis of the television shows Gilmore Girls and Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life, Jane the Virgin, and Black-ish, it is determined that through an intersectional lens modern day television has significantly improved in more positive representations of mother-daughter relationships, although there still exists stereotypes and ideological factors based on race and class within these relationships. The analysis was done by examining cases of racial representation in terms of economics, location, and gender norms. The mother-daughter relationships were examined through the topics of disagreements as well as topics of delight between the mother and daughter characters. Each of these television shows are critically acclaimed and popular, therefore they provide a good selection when examining modern day television media.

Start Date

2-24-2018 9:50 AM

End Date

2-24-2018 11:20 AM

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Feb 24th, 9:50 AM Feb 24th, 11:20 AM

Gilmore Girls, Jane the Virgin, and Black-ish: Intersectionality and Mother-Daughter Relationships on Network Television

This thesis focuses on how mother-daughter relationships are presented in television media. Through the textual analysis of the television shows Gilmore Girls and Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life, Jane the Virgin, and Black-ish, it is determined that through an intersectional lens modern day television has significantly improved in more positive representations of mother-daughter relationships, although there still exists stereotypes and ideological factors based on race and class within these relationships. The analysis was done by examining cases of racial representation in terms of economics, location, and gender norms. The mother-daughter relationships were examined through the topics of disagreements as well as topics of delight between the mother and daughter characters. Each of these television shows are critically acclaimed and popular, therefore they provide a good selection when examining modern day television media.