Presentation Title

Teaching “That Lesbian Show”: The Importance of Fostering Critical Watching Skills

Type of Presentation

Individual presentation

Brief Description of Presentation

While I will have a written paper in front me, I will also be using media to share moments of 'revelation' that my students have had. I will be discussing the format of my class sessions and describe which of my assignments instill the “critical watching” skills that I mention in my abstract. I will also be sharing my action research project on the topic and the effects that the “critical watching” skills have on my past and current students.

Abstract of Proposal

With media innovations like Netflix, students are “binging” media more than ever. Is it our job, as educators, to make sure that our students not only critically read but critically watch? “Watch” is seen as a passive, relaxed verb, but it can serve as an active way to slow down students’ consumption of media and treat it as a source to be critically analyzed. So, I am presenting this question within the Educational Foundations strand of the conference: “How can we, as educators, help students to critically analyze the media they absorb in order to foster political and social awareness?”

I have watched my Writing Seminar II students go through an incredible transformation, from college students relieved to take a “Netflix” class to critical scholars actively discussing justice reform. The key factor in igniting their interest was my use of “binge-worthy” media. My students are required to turn their critical reading skills into critical “watching” skills when viewing Orange is the New Black. Over the course of their semester, their initial assumptions are left behind and their growth as media scholars becomes evident in papers assigned throughout the semester.

By bringing my experiences as an instructor of Writing Seminar II to the Critical Media Literacy conference, I aim to define “binge-worthy” media as well as inspire other educators to explore the use of media in their classroom. Giving students the tools to critically analyze media inspires the 21st century literacy they must possess to be successful in and contributive to society.

Start Date

2-24-2018 8:10 AM

End Date

2-24-2018 9:40 AM

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Feb 24th, 8:10 AM Feb 24th, 9:40 AM

Teaching “That Lesbian Show”: The Importance of Fostering Critical Watching Skills

With media innovations like Netflix, students are “binging” media more than ever. Is it our job, as educators, to make sure that our students not only critically read but critically watch? “Watch” is seen as a passive, relaxed verb, but it can serve as an active way to slow down students’ consumption of media and treat it as a source to be critically analyzed. So, I am presenting this question within the Educational Foundations strand of the conference: “How can we, as educators, help students to critically analyze the media they absorb in order to foster political and social awareness?”

I have watched my Writing Seminar II students go through an incredible transformation, from college students relieved to take a “Netflix” class to critical scholars actively discussing justice reform. The key factor in igniting their interest was my use of “binge-worthy” media. My students are required to turn their critical reading skills into critical “watching” skills when viewing Orange is the New Black. Over the course of their semester, their initial assumptions are left behind and their growth as media scholars becomes evident in papers assigned throughout the semester.

By bringing my experiences as an instructor of Writing Seminar II to the Critical Media Literacy conference, I aim to define “binge-worthy” media as well as inspire other educators to explore the use of media in their classroom. Giving students the tools to critically analyze media inspires the 21st century literacy they must possess to be successful in and contributive to society.