Association of Marketing Theory and Practice Proceedings 2017
 

Document Type

Conference Proceeding

Conference Track

Professional Selling and Sales Management

Publication Date

2017

Abstract

Learning facilitates changes in attitudes and behavior and these changes beseech improved performance and increased sales outcomes. Yet, given the independent nature of most sales positions, with fewer opportunities to engage with supervisors and co-workers, it is reasonable to postulate that many of the benefits of the organizational learning resources may go unrealized causing these employees to feel ill prepared and less committed to performing the duties of their job. The current study offers insight as to how ongoing efforts might produce positive energy toward the application of workplace learning thereby increasing the probability that the benefits will lead to performance outcomes that can be felt on an organizational level. Using a sample of frontline salespeople across varying industries, this study investigates personal learning, defined as the acquisition of knowledge, skills, or competencies which contribute to individual development. We evaluate changes in role ambiguity and organizational commitment as evidence of personal learning. The findings of the study reveal the effects of which may have longstanding organizational impact.

About the Authors

Shalonda K. Bradford (D.B.A., Kennesaw State University) is an Assistant Professor of Marketing and the Assistant Director of Business Development for the Global Logistics and International Business Center at Savannah State University. Dr. Bradford’s research interests are in sales and sales force management, sales performance, workforce development and mentoring.

Brian N. Rutherford (Ph.D., Georgia State University) is an Associate Professor and Director of Sales Research for the Center for Professional Selling at Kennesaw State University and the Doctoral Program Coordinator in Marketing. Dr. Rutherford’s interests are in sales force management, scale development and refinement, multi-faceted/dimensional constructs and mentoring.

Scott B. Friend (Ph.D., Georgia State University) is an Assistant Professor of Marketing in the Farmer School of Business at Miami University. Dr. Friend's interests are in sales and sales force management including buyer-seller relationships, intra-organizational relationships, sales performance and sales failure, key account management, and sales research methodology.

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