Proposal Title

Increasing Students' Intercultural Knowledge and Competence through Internationalization of Ethics Curricula

Track

Research Proposal / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Most students entering the ethics classroom have limited intercultural knowledge and competence (as set out by the AAC&U’s IKC Rubric). As an instructor of ethics, the long-term dispositional growth I am looking to achieve with my students is their progression from a more ethnocentric to a more ethnorelative stance on ethical issues. The question I address is whether or not the incorporation of multicultural components into the ethics curriculum can bring about, for students of ethics, an enhanced awareness of and appreciation for different cultural perspectives on ethical issues, thereby positively impacting their intercultural knowledge and competence.

Proposal Description

One of the key measurements of student success in my ethics class revolves around students’ willingness to step outside the comfort of their own ethical constructs and consider in a critical, empathetic way the views of others. The long-term dispositional growth I look for is students’ progression from an ethnocentric stance with regard to ethics to an ethnorelative stance. Given, however, the limited intercultural knowledge and competence that a student typically brings to the classroom, the problem becomes how to expand the student’s frame of reference. The question my research addresses is this: “Can the incorporation of multicultural components into the ethics curriculum bring about, for students of ethics, an enhanced awareness of different cultural perspectives on ethical issues, thereby positively impacting their intercultural knowledge and competence?”

My intervention involved incorporation of multicultural components into the ethics course curriculum. Component assignments included a pictorial representation of the student’s “moral community,” ethical analyses of films like “Hotel Rwanda,” and what I call “P-A-N-it-Out” exercises, whereby students work in groups to address an ethical issue from different cultural perspectives. Course components such as these were meant to broaden students’ perspectives on different ethical issues and to encourage analysis of issues from a more cross-cultural frame of reference. (In order to give audience members a sense of the nature of these components, I plan to actively engage them in a “P-A-N-it-Out” exercise, whereby they will gain an appreciation for the importance of looking at ethical issues from multiple, culturally-different perspectives.)

Preliminary results of my research do indicate some degree of success in promotion of students’ IKC through internationalization of the ethics curricula. Assessments were both indirect (self-reporting pre/post surveys) and direct (portfolio assignments meant to elicit progressively higher levels of development with regard to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes associated with IKC).

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 4

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 2:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:45 PM

Increasing Students' Intercultural Knowledge and Competence through Internationalization of Ethics Curricula

Room 4

Most students entering the ethics classroom have limited intercultural knowledge and competence (as set out by the AAC&U’s IKC Rubric). As an instructor of ethics, the long-term dispositional growth I am looking to achieve with my students is their progression from a more ethnocentric to a more ethnorelative stance on ethical issues. The question I address is whether or not the incorporation of multicultural components into the ethics curriculum can bring about, for students of ethics, an enhanced awareness of and appreciation for different cultural perspectives on ethical issues, thereby positively impacting their intercultural knowledge and competence.