Proposal Title

Online Homework, Motivation, Academic Effort, and Performance: A Longitudinal Study

Co-Authors

None

Track

Research Project / Teaching with Technology

Proposal Abstract

This research in progress addresses causality and timing among the effects of academic motivation, effort, and performance using longitudinal data from surveys, online homework, and course management systems in college level sociology courses. Previous research has demonstrated the importance of academic motivation in explaining grades and performance on examinations, as well as the role of online resources as they affect motivation and performance. However, few studies have attempted to address causality and time ordering among all of these variables. Data collected from three sections of two sociology courses during the fall semester of 2015 are currently being analyzed. Motivation is measured using an academic motivation scale and self-reports. Effort is measured using hits on online resources, submission times, and total time spent in online homework systems, as well as self-reported effort. Performance includes grades on homework and examinations, as well as course grades. These concepts are measured at several points during the semester, providing information on their time ordering. Ongoing analysis includes statistical modeling of the relationships between key variables, with controls for exogenous variables such as grade point average and demographic characteristics. Data collection from additional courses continues throughout the spring semester of 2016.

Session Format

Poster Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 4:00 PM Mar 30th, 5:00 PM

Online Homework, Motivation, Academic Effort, and Performance: A Longitudinal Study

Room 113

This research in progress addresses causality and timing among the effects of academic motivation, effort, and performance using longitudinal data from surveys, online homework, and course management systems in college level sociology courses. Previous research has demonstrated the importance of academic motivation in explaining grades and performance on examinations, as well as the role of online resources as they affect motivation and performance. However, few studies have attempted to address causality and time ordering among all of these variables. Data collected from three sections of two sociology courses during the fall semester of 2015 are currently being analyzed. Motivation is measured using an academic motivation scale and self-reports. Effort is measured using hits on online resources, submission times, and total time spent in online homework systems, as well as self-reported effort. Performance includes grades on homework and examinations, as well as course grades. These concepts are measured at several points during the semester, providing information on their time ordering. Ongoing analysis includes statistical modeling of the relationships between key variables, with controls for exogenous variables such as grade point average and demographic characteristics. Data collection from additional courses continues throughout the spring semester of 2016.