Proposal Title

Active Learning Partnerships in Biology: Students and In-Service Teachers Benefited from a University Outreach Program

Proposal Abstract

Active learning partnerships were examined as a model to enhance learning for high school students, in-service teachers and graduate students. The study took place as part of the Molecular Biology Initiative (MBI) in the Department of Biology at Georgia Southern University. The program partners graduate students with in-service biology, chemistry and physical science high school teachers. Teachers are assisted with molecular biology laboratory skills, content and resources; and then the expert-novice teams work together to develop and introduce hands-on, inquiry-based science activities in the classroom. Now in its second NSF-funded year, the MBI program has worked with 4-10 teachers each year and impacted over 2000 high school students. Preliminary learning assessment showed substantial knowledge gains for both high school teachers and students, and classroom observations indicated a high level of student engagement due to the hands-on activities. Initial assessment of benefits to the graduate students is currently underway.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 10th, 2:00 PM Mar 10th, 3:00 PM

Active Learning Partnerships in Biology: Students and In-Service Teachers Benefited from a University Outreach Program

Concourse

Active learning partnerships were examined as a model to enhance learning for high school students, in-service teachers and graduate students. The study took place as part of the Molecular Biology Initiative (MBI) in the Department of Biology at Georgia Southern University. The program partners graduate students with in-service biology, chemistry and physical science high school teachers. Teachers are assisted with molecular biology laboratory skills, content and resources; and then the expert-novice teams work together to develop and introduce hands-on, inquiry-based science activities in the classroom. Now in its second NSF-funded year, the MBI program has worked with 4-10 teachers each year and impacted over 2000 high school students. Preliminary learning assessment showed substantial knowledge gains for both high school teachers and students, and classroom observations indicated a high level of student engagement due to the hands-on activities. Initial assessment of benefits to the graduate students is currently underway.