Proposal Title

The Negative Effects of Thought Suppression and Distraction on Memory Encoding and Retrieval

Proposal Abstract

Attempts to suppress or ‘block-out' task-irrelevant stimuli have been shown to amplify their distracting influence (Wegner, 1994). Our laboratory research demonstrates how attempts to actively suppress distracting stimuli affect explicit and implicit memory. The results have practical implications for classroom learning. Distraction during learning and/or assessment may have an effect on explicit but should not impact implicit memory. Our presentation at SoTL Commons will encourage brainstorming and open discussion about the potential for implicit instructional practices in higher education. We will discuss how implicit instructional practices teach students to learn as opposed to explicit strategies, which teach students information. Participants will gain a better understanding of how the effects of distraction in the classroom during learning and/or testing can be minimized through the use of implicit instructional methods that encourage implicit learning. Moreover, we will provide specific examples of implicit instructional practices that encourage implicit learning in different academic domains.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Mar 9th, 3:00 PM Mar 9th, 3:45 PM

The Negative Effects of Thought Suppression and Distraction on Memory Encoding and Retrieval

Room 2911

Attempts to suppress or ‘block-out' task-irrelevant stimuli have been shown to amplify their distracting influence (Wegner, 1994). Our laboratory research demonstrates how attempts to actively suppress distracting stimuli affect explicit and implicit memory. The results have practical implications for classroom learning. Distraction during learning and/or assessment may have an effect on explicit but should not impact implicit memory. Our presentation at SoTL Commons will encourage brainstorming and open discussion about the potential for implicit instructional practices in higher education. We will discuss how implicit instructional practices teach students to learn as opposed to explicit strategies, which teach students information. Participants will gain a better understanding of how the effects of distraction in the classroom during learning and/or testing can be minimized through the use of implicit instructional methods that encourage implicit learning. Moreover, we will provide specific examples of implicit instructional practices that encourage implicit learning in different academic domains.