Proposal Abstract

One difficulty in adopting new classroom tools is persuading students to accept an educational technique out of their comfort zone. Our study investigated student perceptions when Calibrated Peer Review (CPR)™, a web-based program that uses writing for learning and assessing, was introduced into a general chemistry college classroom, and the strategies that helped convert initial intense opposition into acceptance and engagement. We will share the mistakes made, the reasons for students' like or dislike of CPR, the 4 year path taken to understand the issues and modify its implementation for a more positive classroom experience, and why the instructor persisted in the face of resistance. Our findings can be generalized easily to the introduction of any new teaching tool. The audience will have opportunities to pair/share with neighbors about their good, bad and ugly experiences with a teaching innovation and two easy statistical data-handling methods will be explained.

Location

Room 1908

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Files over 10MB may be slow to open. For best results, right-click and select "Save as..."

Share

COinS
 
Mar 13th, 11:00 AM Mar 13th, 11:45 AM

How Do You Get Student Buy-In to A "Wonderful (to You)" Teaching Innovation?

Room 1908

One difficulty in adopting new classroom tools is persuading students to accept an educational technique out of their comfort zone. Our study investigated student perceptions when Calibrated Peer Review (CPR)™, a web-based program that uses writing for learning and assessing, was introduced into a general chemistry college classroom, and the strategies that helped convert initial intense opposition into acceptance and engagement. We will share the mistakes made, the reasons for students' like or dislike of CPR, the 4 year path taken to understand the issues and modify its implementation for a more positive classroom experience, and why the instructor persisted in the face of resistance. Our findings can be generalized easily to the introduction of any new teaching tool. The audience will have opportunities to pair/share with neighbors about their good, bad and ugly experiences with a teaching innovation and two easy statistical data-handling methods will be explained.