Presentation Title

Exploring Threshold Concepts in One-Shot Information Literacy Instruction

Location

Room 1002

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Since the Association of College and Research Libraries’ inclusion of threshold concepts in the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education in 2014, discussions surrounding how to interpret and implement them have rapidly entered the conversations surrounding information literacy instruction. Born out of the teaching and learning literature, threshold concepts define those core concepts that are transformative and necessary to the study of a particular discipline. But how does the Framework employ threshold concepts and how should this inform instructional practice in academic libraries? Can students really attain this level of conceptual knowledge in the one-shot session? This presentation will present research designed to explore possible answers to these questions.

The study uses the Framework’s explanation of threshold concepts as a basis to plan one-shot instruction sessions for freshman level English classes. Students in one group were instructed using learning outcomes based on the knowledge practices and dispositions of the frame “Authority is Constructed and Contextual.” At the end of the class, students were asked to complete an assignment that asked questions about three different source types (a journal article, a magazine article, and a blog post). Using a mixed methods approach, the presenter evaluated responses to the assignment that students in the threshold concept-based sessions and students in skills-only based sessions both took. Using analysis of variance (ANOVA), the presenter compared the groups on various points, including quality of responses and preference for source type. Using simple content analysis, differences in student ideas about authority and research were explored.

Presentation Description

The project explores the effectiveness of using threshold concepts in one-shot information literacy instruction. The presentation gives background and results from a mixed-methods research project conducted by the presenter. A discussion of how the threshold concepts were incorporated and an analysis of the results will be included.

Keywords

information literacy; Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education; threshold concepts; one-shot instruction

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 1st, 9:45 AM Oct 1st, 11:00 AM

Exploring Threshold Concepts in One-Shot Information Literacy Instruction

Room 1002

Since the Association of College and Research Libraries’ inclusion of threshold concepts in the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education in 2014, discussions surrounding how to interpret and implement them have rapidly entered the conversations surrounding information literacy instruction. Born out of the teaching and learning literature, threshold concepts define those core concepts that are transformative and necessary to the study of a particular discipline. But how does the Framework employ threshold concepts and how should this inform instructional practice in academic libraries? Can students really attain this level of conceptual knowledge in the one-shot session? This presentation will present research designed to explore possible answers to these questions.

The study uses the Framework’s explanation of threshold concepts as a basis to plan one-shot instruction sessions for freshman level English classes. Students in one group were instructed using learning outcomes based on the knowledge practices and dispositions of the frame “Authority is Constructed and Contextual.” At the end of the class, students were asked to complete an assignment that asked questions about three different source types (a journal article, a magazine article, and a blog post). Using a mixed methods approach, the presenter evaluated responses to the assignment that students in the threshold concept-based sessions and students in skills-only based sessions both took. Using analysis of variance (ANOVA), the presenter compared the groups on various points, including quality of responses and preference for source type. Using simple content analysis, differences in student ideas about authority and research were explored.