Location

Room 1002

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Higher Education; can be used in 11th and 12th grades

Abstract

Teaching Information Literacy using the CSI Investigation Methodology fulfills two ACRL Frameworks: No. 4, Research as Inquiry, and No. 5, Scholarship as Conversation. This methodology requires structuring lessons so that students use different sources. Students will experience the research process as they uncover new and unexpected information which may or may not confirm their original thesis statement, problem or question. They will realize that researching and critical thinking depend on consistently and continuously asking questions from different perspectives. Like a CSI, students will experience research as inquiry (ACRL No. 4).

Although this type of lesson requires structure, it also demands flexibility so that students discover and question their topic more deeply as new information is unleashed. Having students work together -- like CSIs-- facilitates the experience of scholarship as conversation (ACRL No. 5). Engaging in peer conversations about their research will enable students to approach the issue at-hand from their peers’ perspective. Collaboration affords students opportunities to listen to different points of view and opposing theories. Students will be able to configure a more clearly defined research investigation and, thereby, create a more precise thesis statement, problem or question.

This session will discuss pedagogy used to engage students in Forensic Information Literacy, A CSI Methodology. These tools include structuring activities, forming implicit and explicit questions, using concept maps, drawing evidence-based leads, writing anticipatory slips, etc. Participants will learn how to guide students through the research process as they inquire about their topic and engage in scholarly conversations.

Presentation Description

The CSI Methodology fulfills two ACRL Frameworks: Research as Inquiry and Scholarship as Conversation. Students appreciate research as discovery in which information unfolds, prompting more inquiry. Students experience scholarship as conversation, viewing diverse perspectives. This allows students to understand researching as an evolving discovery process based on inquiry and conversation.

Keywords

Inquiry, Conversation, Pedagogy, Methodology, Scaffolds, Implicit, Explicit, Querying, Questioning, Investigating

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Sep 30th, 8:30 AM Sep 30th, 9:45 AM

Forensic Information Literacy: the CSI Approach to Inquiry and Scholarly Communication

Room 1002

Teaching Information Literacy using the CSI Investigation Methodology fulfills two ACRL Frameworks: No. 4, Research as Inquiry, and No. 5, Scholarship as Conversation. This methodology requires structuring lessons so that students use different sources. Students will experience the research process as they uncover new and unexpected information which may or may not confirm their original thesis statement, problem or question. They will realize that researching and critical thinking depend on consistently and continuously asking questions from different perspectives. Like a CSI, students will experience research as inquiry (ACRL No. 4).

Although this type of lesson requires structure, it also demands flexibility so that students discover and question their topic more deeply as new information is unleashed. Having students work together -- like CSIs-- facilitates the experience of scholarship as conversation (ACRL No. 5). Engaging in peer conversations about their research will enable students to approach the issue at-hand from their peers’ perspective. Collaboration affords students opportunities to listen to different points of view and opposing theories. Students will be able to configure a more clearly defined research investigation and, thereby, create a more precise thesis statement, problem or question.

This session will discuss pedagogy used to engage students in Forensic Information Literacy, A CSI Methodology. These tools include structuring activities, forming implicit and explicit questions, using concept maps, drawing evidence-based leads, writing anticipatory slips, etc. Participants will learn how to guide students through the research process as they inquire about their topic and engage in scholarly conversations.