Presentation Title

“A Writing Process Approach To Student Engagement & Information/Digital Literacies”

Location

Room 1002

Type of Presentation

Panel (1 hour and 15 minutes presentation total for two or more presenters)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

In our classrooms -- where collaborative writing, critical thinking, and information literacies are important foci -- technologies like Google Docs, Google Drive, and concept mapping programs Popplet and Mindomo are more than tools for document production. They are spaces where active learning takes place. In every classroom where writing is a component (common given Writing Across the Curriculum’s influence), invention, drafting, and peer review are crucial to teaching effective literacy practices. Often, peer review is done with worksheets, limiting it to the classroom period. To increase collaboration and effectiveness, technology such as Google (Docs/Drive) replace standard in-class peer review and enhance learning by eliminating some of the obstacles that students face, as suggested by Reyna’s Google Docs in Higher Education Settings: A Preliminary Report. Students may struggle with research as a critical practice, as made clear by scholarship based on Howard, Jameison, and Serviss’ The Citation Project. Programs like Popplet or Mindomo become productive brainstorming and drafting tools, but they are also a means by which students rhetorically visualize their evolving argument and emerging relationships to sources. By framing information literacy in a digital age to include mining the affordances of these digital spaces, this proposal demonstrates how two composition instructors utilize digital spaces to develop successful critical thinking, reading, and writing practices among students. This presentation offers hands-on demonstrations of how we use these programs, integrated with writing process and digital literacy theories, to create an evolving and collaborative space for student research, thinking, research, and writing.

Presentation Description

In our classrooms -- where collaborative writing, critical thinking, and information literacies are important foci -- technologies like Google Docs, Google Drive, and concept mapping programs Popplet and Mindomo are more than tools for document production. They are spaces where active learning takes place. This presentation offers an overview and hands-on demonstration of how we use these programs, integrated with writing process and digital literacy theories, to create an evolving and collaborative space for student research, thinking, research, and writing.

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 1:15 PM Sep 25th, 2:30 PM

“A Writing Process Approach To Student Engagement & Information/Digital Literacies”

Room 1002

In our classrooms -- where collaborative writing, critical thinking, and information literacies are important foci -- technologies like Google Docs, Google Drive, and concept mapping programs Popplet and Mindomo are more than tools for document production. They are spaces where active learning takes place. In every classroom where writing is a component (common given Writing Across the Curriculum’s influence), invention, drafting, and peer review are crucial to teaching effective literacy practices. Often, peer review is done with worksheets, limiting it to the classroom period. To increase collaboration and effectiveness, technology such as Google (Docs/Drive) replace standard in-class peer review and enhance learning by eliminating some of the obstacles that students face, as suggested by Reyna’s Google Docs in Higher Education Settings: A Preliminary Report. Students may struggle with research as a critical practice, as made clear by scholarship based on Howard, Jameison, and Serviss’ The Citation Project. Programs like Popplet or Mindomo become productive brainstorming and drafting tools, but they are also a means by which students rhetorically visualize their evolving argument and emerging relationships to sources. By framing information literacy in a digital age to include mining the affordances of these digital spaces, this proposal demonstrates how two composition instructors utilize digital spaces to develop successful critical thinking, reading, and writing practices among students. This presentation offers hands-on demonstrations of how we use these programs, integrated with writing process and digital literacy theories, to create an evolving and collaborative space for student research, thinking, research, and writing.