Location

Room 129

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Librarians face numerous challenges when designing effective, sustainable assessment methods for student learning outcomes in one-shot, course-integrated library instruction sessions. In this presentation, we will share how librarians at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) use a rubric to assess students’ authentic learning products from one-shot instruction sessions for a research and writing course required for all undergraduate students. We will share how rubric-based assessment enhances student learning and explain how we use this type of assessment to demonstrate our information literacy program’s effectiveness.

University 200: Inquiry and the Craft of Argument is a sophomore-level writing and research course required for all VCU students. Information literacy is a stated core competency for UNIV 200 and librarians provide instruction for all of the approximately 80 sections of the course offered each semester. To assess student learning in these sessions, we developed a worksheet and a rubric based on information literacy learning outcomes defined with UNIV 200 faculty. The worksheet serves as both an applied learning exercise for students and an assessment object.

In this presentation, participants will learn about the benefits of using rubrics for learning assessment in a one-shot environment, the mechanics of how we employed rubric-based assessment programmatically for UNIV 200 at VCU, and our findings on students’ achievement of information literacy learning outcomes. Additionally, we will discuss how we use our findings to improve librarian teaching, and how a rubric-based assessment model can be translated to any one-shot environment regardless of content being taught.

Presentation Description

The presenters will explain the benefits of using rubrics to assess information literacy learning outcomes in a one-shot library instruction environment. Participants will also learning how the rubric-based assessment model can be translated to any one-shot environment regardless of the content being taught.

Keywords

assessment, rubrics, information literacy, library instruction, one-shot, course-integrated, learning outcomes

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 10:00 AM Oct 10th, 11:30 AM

Using Rubrics to Assess Authentic Learning Products from One-Shot, Course-Integrated Library Instruction

Room 129

Librarians face numerous challenges when designing effective, sustainable assessment methods for student learning outcomes in one-shot, course-integrated library instruction sessions. In this presentation, we will share how librarians at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) use a rubric to assess students’ authentic learning products from one-shot instruction sessions for a research and writing course required for all undergraduate students. We will share how rubric-based assessment enhances student learning and explain how we use this type of assessment to demonstrate our information literacy program’s effectiveness.

University 200: Inquiry and the Craft of Argument is a sophomore-level writing and research course required for all VCU students. Information literacy is a stated core competency for UNIV 200 and librarians provide instruction for all of the approximately 80 sections of the course offered each semester. To assess student learning in these sessions, we developed a worksheet and a rubric based on information literacy learning outcomes defined with UNIV 200 faculty. The worksheet serves as both an applied learning exercise for students and an assessment object.

In this presentation, participants will learn about the benefits of using rubrics for learning assessment in a one-shot environment, the mechanics of how we employed rubric-based assessment programmatically for UNIV 200 at VCU, and our findings on students’ achievement of information literacy learning outcomes. Additionally, we will discuss how we use our findings to improve librarian teaching, and how a rubric-based assessment model can be translated to any one-shot environment regardless of content being taught.