Presentation Title

Don’t Stop Thinking about Assessment: Ongoing Evaluation of Course-Integrated Assessment

Location

Lobby

Type of Presentation

Poster Session (45 minutes)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This poster will share the path taken to introduce student learning assessment into course-integrated information literacy sessions at one academic library. Four years of continuous evaluation of this initiative has revealed both successes and unexpected missteps. The plan remains in flux in order to respond to these findings, allowing for adjustments to the design, administration, interpretation, and reporting processes of the assessments.

The presenter will share 1) strategies used to educate teaching librarians about authentic assessment and to promote sharing of assessment ideas and results, including an ongoing series of professional development workshops; 2) collaborative design and redesign of assessments that require students to engage in high-level critical thinking; 3) the use of assessment results to shape teaching librarians’ individual instructional goals, as well as programmatic goals; 4) examples of lessons learned throughout the process; 5) applications of this type of assessment in settings other than course-integrated information literacy instruction.

Attendees may be particularly interested in problems that were encountered while attempting to create a culture of assessment within this instruction program. The poster will share specific examples, such as: hesitation among teaching librarians to adopt classroom assessment; discontent with reporting processes for annual evaluation; maintaining focus on assessment that matters, rather than assessment just for the sake of assessment; and, avoiding the creation of a culture of “hoops and hurdles.” The poster will illustrate ways that these issues were addressed and future plans for course-integrated assessment within the program.

Presentation Description

The ambitious task of creating culture of assessments within academic libraries calls for flexible plans and ongoing evaluation. Learn about one academic library's program-level initiative to incorporate authentic student learning assessments into course-integrated information literacy sessions. The poster will highlight implementation strategies, administrative procedures, and reporting processes from the last four years. Applications of this type of assessment in settings other than course-integrated information literacy instruction will be suggested.

Keywords

library instruction, assessment, student learning, organizational change

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 1:30 PM Oct 10th, 5:00 PM

Don’t Stop Thinking about Assessment: Ongoing Evaluation of Course-Integrated Assessment

Lobby

This poster will share the path taken to introduce student learning assessment into course-integrated information literacy sessions at one academic library. Four years of continuous evaluation of this initiative has revealed both successes and unexpected missteps. The plan remains in flux in order to respond to these findings, allowing for adjustments to the design, administration, interpretation, and reporting processes of the assessments.

The presenter will share 1) strategies used to educate teaching librarians about authentic assessment and to promote sharing of assessment ideas and results, including an ongoing series of professional development workshops; 2) collaborative design and redesign of assessments that require students to engage in high-level critical thinking; 3) the use of assessment results to shape teaching librarians’ individual instructional goals, as well as programmatic goals; 4) examples of lessons learned throughout the process; 5) applications of this type of assessment in settings other than course-integrated information literacy instruction.

Attendees may be particularly interested in problems that were encountered while attempting to create a culture of assessment within this instruction program. The poster will share specific examples, such as: hesitation among teaching librarians to adopt classroom assessment; discontent with reporting processes for annual evaluation; maintaining focus on assessment that matters, rather than assessment just for the sake of assessment; and, avoiding the creation of a culture of “hoops and hurdles.” The poster will illustrate ways that these issues were addressed and future plans for course-integrated assessment within the program.