Presentation Title

Librarian + Faculty + Student = Synergy

Location

Room 129

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This presentation focuses on one of many customized examples of librarian/faculty collaboration at our university. All first-year composition courses are matched with a personal librarian who provides an instruction session to build relationships with students and to address the following IL objective embedded into the course: “Students will compose documents that include a clear focus/thesis/claim with evidence to support the main idea. Students will locate, analyze, and assess information from a variety of sources including on-line catalogs, databases, interviews, and other information sources to support the document.” The instruction is usually scheduled shortly after the instructor explains the assignment. Following the session, the librarian gives an online Quia test for library/faculty assessment. We will discuss our general university IL model and successful strategies in addition to our pairing based on a controversial position paper for which the librarian customizes IL instruction by demonstrating CQ Researcher, Opposing Viewpoints, and Lexus-Nexus. Related prewriting activities call on students to discover and compare connotations in articles about a controversial event each student chooses. Students could analyze biased rhetoric’s possible impact on society in general as well as on individuals and write their conclusions in an essay or they could take their own stand on an aspect of a controversial topic after researching both sides. The ultimate goal is to imprint on the students’ minds the effect of rhetoric in controversial topics on almost all aspects of their lives with the goal of transferring this knowledge into lifelong learning by intelligent use of information literacy.

Presentation Description

This presentation focuses on one of many examples of librarian/faculty collaboration at our university. All first-year composition courses are matched with a personal librarian for the purpose of addressing information literacy objectives. The Librarian will discuss our general IL model and strategies that have made it successful, and the English Professor will explain the essay assignment they worked on together.

Keywords

Identifying bias, higher-order thinking, collaboration, connotation, evaluation, rhetoric, lifelong learning, social issues, metacognition

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 2:45 PM Oct 10th, 4:00 PM

Librarian + Faculty + Student = Synergy

Room 129

This presentation focuses on one of many customized examples of librarian/faculty collaboration at our university. All first-year composition courses are matched with a personal librarian who provides an instruction session to build relationships with students and to address the following IL objective embedded into the course: “Students will compose documents that include a clear focus/thesis/claim with evidence to support the main idea. Students will locate, analyze, and assess information from a variety of sources including on-line catalogs, databases, interviews, and other information sources to support the document.” The instruction is usually scheduled shortly after the instructor explains the assignment. Following the session, the librarian gives an online Quia test for library/faculty assessment. We will discuss our general university IL model and successful strategies in addition to our pairing based on a controversial position paper for which the librarian customizes IL instruction by demonstrating CQ Researcher, Opposing Viewpoints, and Lexus-Nexus. Related prewriting activities call on students to discover and compare connotations in articles about a controversial event each student chooses. Students could analyze biased rhetoric’s possible impact on society in general as well as on individuals and write their conclusions in an essay or they could take their own stand on an aspect of a controversial topic after researching both sides. The ultimate goal is to imprint on the students’ minds the effect of rhetoric in controversial topics on almost all aspects of their lives with the goal of transferring this knowledge into lifelong learning by intelligent use of information literacy.