Presentation Title

How Can Common Reading Programs Impact Information Literacy?

Location

Room 218

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Common Reading, One Book, or First Year reading programs are being implemented on many college campuses and communities. Georgia Perimeter College is in the fifth year of GPC Reads, and has been successful in bringing nationally recognized authors, such as Natasha Trethewey, as well as new authors like William Kamkwamba, to campus for discussions, book readings, and panels. In addition, the books are read by many classes in a variety of disciplines, including the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Librarians and faculty work together to select a book and author, and to create programs that will reach the most students. What is the impact of these programs on students’ information literacy skills? Are they worth the effort and funding? What should be the goals of such programs? How can we effectively assess their impact? How can we partner with public libraries and schools?

Presentation Description

Common Reading, One Book, or First Year reading programs are being implemented on many college campuses and communities. Georgia Perimeter College is in the fifth year of GPC Reads, a collaborative program organized by faculty and librarians. The presentation will address issues such as the goals of such programs, their impact on information literacy skills, how they can be funded, partnerships, and assessment.

Keywords

Partnerships, information literacy, common read programs, assessment, reading programs

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 10th, 2:45 PM Oct 10th, 4:00 PM

How Can Common Reading Programs Impact Information Literacy?

Room 218

Common Reading, One Book, or First Year reading programs are being implemented on many college campuses and communities. Georgia Perimeter College is in the fifth year of GPC Reads, and has been successful in bringing nationally recognized authors, such as Natasha Trethewey, as well as new authors like William Kamkwamba, to campus for discussions, book readings, and panels. In addition, the books are read by many classes in a variety of disciplines, including the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Librarians and faculty work together to select a book and author, and to create programs that will reach the most students. What is the impact of these programs on students’ information literacy skills? Are they worth the effort and funding? What should be the goals of such programs? How can we effectively assess their impact? How can we partner with public libraries and schools?