Presentation Title

The DPLA and Open Access Initiatives: Characteristics, Collections, Collaboration & the Cultivation of Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning

Presenter Information

Trish A. Vlastnik, CCPSFollow

Location

Room 1220B

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Other

Knowledge of the DPLA repositories and open archives initiatives is relevant to many user groups including K-12, Higher Education and the general public.

Abstract

From its inception in 2010 to its launch a little over a year ago, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) has actively engaged partners (like the Digital Library of Georgia), collating digital content for open access to books, images, historic records, and audiovisual materials. This presentation will explore the DPLA platform, its resources and delve into the potential for the DPLA and similar initiatives to be valuable tools supporting collaboration among educators and inquiry-based teaching and learning.
Resources from digital repositories offer countless opportunities for collaboration and instruction across disciplines. Encountering archival materials in instruction affords students occasions to develop higher order thinking skills, engage in inquiry-based thinking, evaluate evidence and arrive at informed opinions based on historically relevant perspectives. Digital archives offer librarians and teachers historically relevant resources to enrich lessons, foster creativity in the classroom and maintain research and study guides (i.e. Livebinders and LibGuides).
A full discussion of the merits and benefits of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) is beyond the time allotted for this discussion. However, the presentation will note how these initiatives allow users to create new applications and contribute to the proliferation of digital resources. Specific points of consideration include how digital surrogates hold the potential to inform students’ general knowledge and life experiences, improve critical thinking skills, support college and career readiness, and contribute to an understanding of information literacy in the digital environment. An annotated list of open source applications, including resources for primary sources and tools for instruction, organization and research, will be available.

Presentation Description

We will survey open access initiatives and the opportunities presented by these projects to support information literacy in the digital age. The Digital Public Library of America, and its partner, the Digital Library of Georgia will be in the spotlight as we explore their platforms, resources, and potential as tools that support collaboration across disciplines and inquiry-based teaching and learning.

Keywords

DPLA; open access, digital library, digital archives, digital collections, digital repositories, OAI, critical thinking skills, HOTS, Common Core, FOSS

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Oct 11th, 9:45 AM Oct 11th, 11:00 AM

The DPLA and Open Access Initiatives: Characteristics, Collections, Collaboration & the Cultivation of Inquiry-Based Teaching and Learning

Room 1220B

From its inception in 2010 to its launch a little over a year ago, the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) has actively engaged partners (like the Digital Library of Georgia), collating digital content for open access to books, images, historic records, and audiovisual materials. This presentation will explore the DPLA platform, its resources and delve into the potential for the DPLA and similar initiatives to be valuable tools supporting collaboration among educators and inquiry-based teaching and learning.
Resources from digital repositories offer countless opportunities for collaboration and instruction across disciplines. Encountering archival materials in instruction affords students occasions to develop higher order thinking skills, engage in inquiry-based thinking, evaluate evidence and arrive at informed opinions based on historically relevant perspectives. Digital archives offer librarians and teachers historically relevant resources to enrich lessons, foster creativity in the classroom and maintain research and study guides (i.e. Livebinders and LibGuides).
A full discussion of the merits and benefits of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) is beyond the time allotted for this discussion. However, the presentation will note how these initiatives allow users to create new applications and contribute to the proliferation of digital resources. Specific points of consideration include how digital surrogates hold the potential to inform students’ general knowledge and life experiences, improve critical thinking skills, support college and career readiness, and contribute to an understanding of information literacy in the digital environment. An annotated list of open source applications, including resources for primary sources and tools for instruction, organization and research, will be available.