Location

Room 218

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

This panel, consisting of instructors of the Introduction to Women’s Studies course, is concerned with including information literacy and skills training concepts into curriculum in a way that supplements our subject matter. In an introductory level course there is usually a broad range of experience in information literacy. As may be expected, upper class students have a better understanding of the research process than first year students and general education students have less interest in subject-specific research than majors or minors. Both of these predispose students to resistance to new techniques. Despite these differences, we found that most students stated that their professors do not teach about the process of research, but rather assume that students know how to do it. Students are often not aware of the various techniques and resources available to them and do not know whether the information that they get is reliable. To meet these objectives, we collaborated with a university librarian and conducted two hands-on workshops per class involving both web-based and database research. Then, we tested students’ understanding with course assignments tailored around the workshops. This activity augmented our curriculum because students explored databases and internet searches specifically geared towards research in the field of Women’s Studies. From our experience in almost thirty classes, our panel will show how to effectively integrate information literacy and tailor it to a specific subject. We would also like to share some of the challenges we have encountered due to the spectrum of experience in our classrooms and how we have dealt with potential resistance.

Presentation Description

This is a panel of instructors in the field of Women’s Studies who will discuss how we have integrated information literacy into our curriculum in a way that is specific to our subject matter. We will discuss our collaboration with a university librarian that includes hands-on workshops and the subsequent assignments used to assess students’ understanding. We will discuss the challenges and opportunities in introductory level classrooms of students with different majors, interests and class levels. The ideas presented in this panel can be utilized by higher education librarians and by students and instructors in any department, especially in fostering collaborations.

Keywords

Women's studies, Information literacy, Librarian-faculty collaboration

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Sep 25th, 10:00 AM Sep 25th, 11:15 AM

Incorporating Information Literacy into Introductory Courses

Room 218

This panel, consisting of instructors of the Introduction to Women’s Studies course, is concerned with including information literacy and skills training concepts into curriculum in a way that supplements our subject matter. In an introductory level course there is usually a broad range of experience in information literacy. As may be expected, upper class students have a better understanding of the research process than first year students and general education students have less interest in subject-specific research than majors or minors. Both of these predispose students to resistance to new techniques. Despite these differences, we found that most students stated that their professors do not teach about the process of research, but rather assume that students know how to do it. Students are often not aware of the various techniques and resources available to them and do not know whether the information that they get is reliable. To meet these objectives, we collaborated with a university librarian and conducted two hands-on workshops per class involving both web-based and database research. Then, we tested students’ understanding with course assignments tailored around the workshops. This activity augmented our curriculum because students explored databases and internet searches specifically geared towards research in the field of Women’s Studies. From our experience in almost thirty classes, our panel will show how to effectively integrate information literacy and tailor it to a specific subject. We would also like to share some of the challenges we have encountered due to the spectrum of experience in our classrooms and how we have dealt with potential resistance.