Individual Presentation or Panel Title

Papo Y Yo, on the Potential of Video Games for Torpefication and Empathy

Abstract

The video game industry generates over 15 billion dollars a year. Video games are present in many homes and phones of the Western world as well as many realms beyond our homes such as education, health or the military. Researchers have explored this “wild beast” in order to understand it and harness it benefits for various purposes.

While video game research has dissected many of the tools they use to teach players, one of its quintessential characteristic has yet to be substantially explored: the game play curriculum. My presentation seeks to shed light on this veiled domain by focusing on my experience playing Papo y yo, a game created by Vander Caballero based on his childhood and his relationship with his abusive, alcoholic father.

Through this auto-ethnographic account I will unpack two moments during which I felt torpefied, two moments during which the possibilities of game play curriculum shook me to my core. Based on this, I will and explore the implications curriculum game play can have for learning and empathy.

Presentation Description

While video game research has dissected many of the tools they use to teach players, one of its quintessential characteristic has yet to be substantially explored: the game play curriculum. My presentation seeks to shed light on this veiled domain by focusing on my experience playing Papo y yo, a game created by Vander Caballero based on his childhood and his relationship with his abusive, alcoholic father.

Keywords

Video games, Game play curriculum, Empathy

Location

Talmadge

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Jun 9th, 2:15 PM Jun 9th, 3:30 PM

Papo Y Yo, on the Potential of Video Games for Torpefication and Empathy

Talmadge

The video game industry generates over 15 billion dollars a year. Video games are present in many homes and phones of the Western world as well as many realms beyond our homes such as education, health or the military. Researchers have explored this “wild beast” in order to understand it and harness it benefits for various purposes.

While video game research has dissected many of the tools they use to teach players, one of its quintessential characteristic has yet to be substantially explored: the game play curriculum. My presentation seeks to shed light on this veiled domain by focusing on my experience playing Papo y yo, a game created by Vander Caballero based on his childhood and his relationship with his abusive, alcoholic father.

Through this auto-ethnographic account I will unpack two moments during which I felt torpefied, two moments during which the possibilities of game play curriculum shook me to my core. Based on this, I will and explore the implications curriculum game play can have for learning and empathy.